Moultrie Products
Target panic
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Bow4em 23-Aug-22
spike78 23-Aug-22
Bow4em 23-Aug-22
fdp 23-Aug-22
Live2Hunt 23-Aug-22
wyobullshooter 23-Aug-22
6pointbull 23-Aug-22
scentman 23-Aug-22
txhunter58 23-Aug-22
6pointbull 23-Aug-22
6pointbull 23-Aug-22
TGbow 23-Aug-22
Shug 23-Aug-22
HDE 23-Aug-22
Grey Ghost 23-Aug-22
Whatthefoc 23-Aug-22
midwest 23-Aug-22
Grunt-N-Gobble 23-Aug-22
walks with a gimp 23-Aug-22
RD in WI 23-Aug-22
Michael 23-Aug-22
grape 24-Aug-22
Rgiesey 24-Aug-22
Whatthefoc 24-Aug-22
midwest 24-Aug-22
Helgermite 24-Aug-22
Live2Hunt 24-Aug-22
x-man 24-Aug-22
Rgiesey 24-Aug-22
Ironbow 24-Aug-22
HDE 24-Aug-22
Swampbuck 24-Aug-22
Huntskifishcook 24-Aug-22
WhattheFOC 25-Aug-22
Jaquomo 25-Aug-22
Grey Ghost 25-Aug-22
Jaquomo 25-Aug-22
Tilzbow 25-Aug-22
greg simon 25-Aug-22
From: Bow4em
23-Aug-22
I have been struggling with target panic for years now with a standard tru fire trigger style release I couldn’t get on target to save my life. Finally had enough of it bought a b3 ghost back tension release and took the whole trigger aspect out of the game. Been shooting with it for about 4 days now and what a world of difference for me. Can hold to the pin steady and rip them off getting great groups all the way out to 60 yards. I am so happy to be back on my game and even better right before deer season.

From: spike78
23-Aug-22
Do you mean punching the trigger panic or holding low and releasing?

From: Bow4em
23-Aug-22
With a trigger my brain wasn’t even letting me get on target I was just dropping in and punching the trigger hoping to hit where I wanted to, it was terrible. I know it’s all a physiological mind game.

From: fdp
23-Aug-22
Sometimes an equipment change will be a long term solution and sometimes not. Keep an eye on the TP signs and don't let it creep back in wearing different clothes.

From: Live2Hunt
23-Aug-22
shoot without releasing an arrow for a week or 2 to get your brain relaxed to holding the pin on target.

23-Aug-22
“Sometimes an equipment change will be a long term solution and sometimes not. Keep an eye on the TP signs and don't let it creep back in wearing different clothes”

^^^^That! You may be a lucky one but if you’ve been struggling with TP for years it’s highly unlikely you’ve learned to control it in 4 days. Now that you’ve learned to shoot with a surprise release you’re definitely on the right track. Good luck!

From: 6pointbull
23-Aug-22
Some TP comes from trying to hold too much draw weight. With my first bow many years ago, I struggled a great deal until I dropped my weight. It was even better with a new bow purchase years later, one that had more let off and easier to shoot.

From: scentman
23-Aug-22
6pointbull, spot on for me... bought a shorter bow with 75 lbs draw weight and that messed me up for some time, bought a Ross longer axle to axle and 55 lbs made all the difference...relising the short bow felt like it was going to jump off my hand... Bowtech.

From: txhunter58
23-Aug-22
I got TP after many years of shooting the same bow. What worked for me is to just stop shooting completely for a couple of weeks. I was over practicing. But that is hard to do if your season is very soon.

From: 6pointbull
23-Aug-22

From: 6pointbull
23-Aug-22
What was weird for me was it was only on targets. Actual animals didn't cause any problems, and I have killed many.

From: TGbow
23-Aug-22
I've only shot recurves n longbows but I dealt with TP years ago. I would stand 10 ft from the target and would not release, let it down. Even now, at times I will pull back and hold..let it down just to keep my brain programmed. Hope what you are doing works for you. It is a mental thing for sure.

From: Shug
23-Aug-22
Train “ your” perfect shot sequence to muscle memory on a blank bale at 5 feet (1000’s of shots) Slowly work your way back just a few shots a day 10 yards and under shooting at a pizza box top size cardboard… no markings on it to avoid any panic of aiming at a small spot… Anticipating nothing but your conclusion of the shot… As humans we are built to anticipate. ( Christmas, the weekend the first time a girls sticks her hand in your pants) get away from thinking about hitting a trigger . Shoot what ever release you use with back tension to set it off. Then just train to pull to your conclusion and the release goes off somewhere in between commit to conclusion while you’re focusing on the spot… truly that “ simple”

From: HDE
23-Aug-22
"What worked for me is to just stop shooting completely for a couple of weeks."

I've stopped now for going on 3 years. Hopefully picking it up again soon will have helped me forget stupid repetitive habits.

What messed me up was trying to be pinpoint accurate without moving around at all prior to shooting.

From: Grey Ghost
23-Aug-22
There are several forms of target panic ranging from a slight flinch just before release, to the inability to hold the pin on target, to locking up at certain positions relative to the target, to uncontrollable full body shakes at the moment the site picture is right. All of them relate to anticipating the shot before it happens. That’s why learning how to shoot with a surprise release is usually the cure, regardless of the weapon.

Matt

From: Whatthefoc
23-Aug-22
4 days - wow. I took me all winter to reprogram … and the TP is still there just waiting for me to let it back in. My version was the ‘stuck low’ variety - for which I had devised some workarounds that were NOT a good long term plan :)

Let me share a real eye opener for me … when I started aiming again (after many sessions of blank baling and/or aim only) I used LARGE dots - like side plate size. Pulling thru the resistance release caused me to shake but even though my pin float was using the entire dot, my groups were consistently half the size of the dot - or smaller. Until you learn to completely trust the float, your brain is eventually gonna try to find a way to command release. Today I’m shooting teacup groups out to 50m with a thumb button and archery is fun again. I have some guys in this site to thank for their advice.

The boogie man has persistence, despite our resistance. Good luck. WTF

From: midwest
23-Aug-22
I thought this was a good video...

23-Aug-22
The NockOn Strap BT release was a huge help to me with getting over TP.

23-Aug-22
I bought a Siegfried SCAT hydraulic release and it has helped me a ton.

From: RD in WI
23-Aug-22
I used the SCAT release as well. After a month of training with it, I could shoot any release with good results. Congratulations on getting over the hump.

From: Michael
23-Aug-22
In 2017 I had it really bad. I wold hold high and still shoot. I would flinch bad and shoot etc etc.

What helped me the most was watching a video Bill Winke did on it. Basically I would shoot 100 arrows a night for 2 weeks strait. Every arrow was at 10 yards at a large target (didn’t have a bale for blind bale shooting). I wouldn’t aim. Just focused on form. Still shot the wrist rocket but performed a bank tension release with it. Also shortened it up so the trigger was in the middle of my finger instead of the tip. After that I shot 20 yards and continued the steps. I won’t say I shot great that fall but for the most part it went away. Now days good to go. Just focus on the form and using my back to trigger the wrist rocket.

From: grape
24-Aug-22
I think Shrug just may have screwed me up. Now every time I settle in on my target, I will be thinking about the first time a girl put her hand in my pants! Well, that was a long time ago, so I may forget before I hit the trigger!! That still cracks me up!!

From: Rgiesey
24-Aug-22
Back tension release or clicker are good tools. Blank bale is a good way to practice or shoot with your eyes closed. Don’t practice a ton in the future.

From: Whatthefoc
24-Aug-22
With blank baling, I found myself starting to aim at any little mark on the bale - so either shoot with closed eyes, or better yet take your sight off. Another good drill is what we call ‘aimers’. Just draw and aim aim aim until you begin to break down - then let down. You’ll be amazed at how steady you are able to hold when you know you’re not going to shoot. A variation of this drill that helped me a lot was a dry fire of sorts. Using a Stan Perfex with the trainer lock pin installed, you do your entire shot sequence - but the release only clicks - it does not open. Kinda like a dry fire drill with a rifle - if you are anticipating the release at all, it will be obvious during this drill.

From: midwest
24-Aug-22
Of all the advice I see on here, telling someone to shoot less is the worst, IMO. Fix the problem, don't hide from it.

From: Helgermite
24-Aug-22
I've struggled with TP for years. Sometimes struggling to get on the dot, others a total breakdown of everything along with a major flinch.

An equipment change definitely started the process to beating it. But the ultimate solution was to shoot close range (2-5 yds) with my eyes closed. I do it at the end of every shooting session when my muscles are already tired and would struggle to hold steady on target and sometimes at the start of practice. This really builds the proper muscle memory of pulling thru the shot and squeezing a surprise release. Something else, when using an index finger release, make sure the trigger is nestled into the second joint of the finger not the first. Then releasing is more about back tension while making a fist rather than pulling with a finger.

From: Live2Hunt
24-Aug-22
The only thing bad with blank bailing is you are not doing the one thing that is causing the problem, aiming. It's great for form practice, but for TP your better off doing the shoot not shoot. Pull, aim, hold, think release. This puts you through all the motions of a shot.

From: x-man
24-Aug-22
I agree with Live2Hunt. I coached for over ten years and there isn't one and only one way to cure TP. However, the one way that worked more often than the others was the "can't-fire" release. Mine was made by TruFire, I believe it's marketed as a draw check tool. A solid machined barrel with a deep fixed hook for the string loop and a trigger that does nothing. Draw, go through the entire aiming sequence, then let down. Repeat. I've had some shooters flinch so bad that they nearly derailed their bow while trying to break that fixed trigger off.

Eventually I would have them slowly squeeze that fixed trigger while aiming. Once they could do that without flinching I would replace the fixed trigger with a spring and watch as they slowly bent the spring back. A couple hundred simulated shots later, they were ready to try a real release again.

From: Rgiesey
24-Aug-22
Everybody I know that has dealt with tp shoots less. Proud to give the worst advice on bowsite. Good thing is pick what you think will work for you

From: Ironbow
24-Aug-22
Live2hunt and Xman are spot on.

From: HDE
24-Aug-22
Unless someone has actually experienced TP, it's difficult - impossible really - to know how it affects you. The solution is retraining yourself to not do what you currently do.

I never had an issue until I tried to be pinpoint accurate with no pin movement for whatever stupid reason. For me, I just need to focus on pie-plate accuracy at 30 yds and not baseball accurate.

From: Swampbuck
24-Aug-22
Can someone explain TP. I noticed switching releases I wasn’t use to the trigger, and I wasn’t consistent. After getting use to trigger pull everything came right back together. For me I think muscle memory was key

24-Aug-22
I found the video Midwest posted a couple months ago. Shooting a string cut to my draw length in my living room every evening has been a game changer. Focusing solely on the release without any other consequences has entirely changed my shooting.

From: WhattheFOC
25-Aug-22
The ‘can’t fire’ method above makes good sense. It’s exactly what you can do with the Stan Perfex with trainer lock. Draw anchor aim puuuull click. When you can do it perfectly, simply remove the pin and let er rip.

From: Jaquomo
25-Aug-22
The Saunders Firing Line release trainer has been golden for me. I now keep it in my camp trailer and run a dozen releases before I go out hunting in the a.m.

From: Grey Ghost
25-Aug-22
Here's a TP story I'll never forget. I was shooting in a Cabelas sponsored 3D tournament in Oklahoma. As my group was standing around waiting for the tournament to start, one of the shooters says, "guys, I'm gonna forewarn you, I've got a bit of a target panic issue." I didn't think much of it. since I knew several archers who struggled with TP, but this guy's case was next level.

So this poor guy steps up to the first target, draws, aims, then his entire body shook like he was having a seizure. He'd let down, regroup, then do the same thing all over again. Sometimes it would take him 4-5 draw/shake/let down sequences before he'd finally get a shot off. He was a decent shot when he'd actually loose an arrow. I felt so sorry for him.

It was a real eye-opener for me. I've often wondered if he ever cured himself, or just gave up on archery.

Matt

From: Jaquomo
25-Aug-22
One of the greatest target archers (and bowhunters- still is, now in his 80s) in the pre-compound era developed TP so badly that he would show up for a local shoot, shoot the first target or two, and if the demon was there he would leave. Funny thing is, he never had TP on animals, only foam. He is a stone killer when he doesn't have to think about it.

From: Tilzbow
25-Aug-22
I got it bad in the late 90’s when I was really into traditional bows and started out shooting G Fred Asbell’s swing draw method. It was so bad my entire body would start to shake at about half draw. I tried everything I read to cure it and ultimately fought it until early 2014 when I read “Idiot Proof Archery” by Bernie Pellerite. I was guilty of doing nearly everything that he described and also have the personality (type A) that’s conducive to developing target panic. Since he described the issues and causes so perfectly it help me decide that he understood the cure and for me that turned out to be developing a surprise release. Once I got that with my compound it still took a while to move past any form of TP with the wheel bow but I still had symptoms with the stick bows for a few years. However last year and this year I’ve had zero issues with either style of bow and it seems my 20+ year battle with the beast is in the past.

My point is if you’re struggling I’d highly suggest reading and following the advice in the book. It’s out of print now but you might be able to find a copy on Amazon.

From: greg simon
25-Aug-22
Tilzbow I had the same experience with Bernie Pellerite's book. It really helped me. I recommend it for anyone dealing with target panic. Looks like it's available online for around 15 bucks.

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