Moultrie Products
? for Lifeline/Prusik knot users
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Blue Buck 20-Sep-22
fuzzy 20-Sep-22
fuzzy 20-Sep-22
Scrappy 20-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 20-Sep-22
TGbow 20-Sep-22
TGbow 20-Sep-22
Rocky D 20-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 20-Sep-22
Overland 20-Sep-22
Zbone 20-Sep-22
WV Mountaineer 20-Sep-22
Rocky D 20-Sep-22
Bow Bullet 20-Sep-22
Medicinemann 20-Sep-22
Lewis 20-Sep-22
Rocky D 21-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 21-Sep-22
Rocky D 21-Sep-22
Michael 22-Sep-22
Medicinemann 23-Sep-22
Rocky D 23-Sep-22
Michael 23-Sep-22
Rocky D 23-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 23-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 23-Sep-22
Michael 23-Sep-22
WV Mountaineer 24-Sep-22
Rocky D 25-Sep-22
Ambush 25-Sep-22
2Wild Bill 26-Sep-22
Rocky D 26-Sep-22
From: Blue Buck
20-Sep-22
Any recommendations for replacement rope for the short rope that makes up the Prusik knot? Where to buy? I've got a few that got chewed up by squirrels and need to replace them. Having trouble finding them online. Thanks in advance and hunt safe!

From: fuzzy
20-Sep-22
Check with any Foresty Supply store online

From: fuzzy
20-Sep-22
https://www.shforestrysupplies.com/

From: Scrappy
20-Sep-22

Scrappy's Link
Google climbing rope by the foot and you will get several results. I can't remember the exact diameter I use off the top of my head.

From: 2Wild Bill
20-Sep-22
I use 9mm or 10mm climbing rope with a kermantle finish. You can probably find some short pieces on ebay. When you tie the Prusik knot loop position the tied knot on the piece that lays across the turns and not in the loop. Reason being that it puts less stress on the tied knot rather than it being in the loop. I use a Water knot to make the loop.

From: TGbow
20-Sep-22
I think Prussic knots are usually 7mm with a 9mm climbing rope. Safe Tree hubt has some good tether n lifeline stuff...made from mountain climbing grade rope that repels water better

From: TGbow
20-Sep-22
Or you can order from REI, ever how many feet you want.

From: Rocky D
20-Sep-22
I would use a dynamic rope made of a nylon or polyester so the will be some stretching instead of sudden stop! 8mm would probably work well!

I used to use this stuff a lot back when I hung under helicopters a lot!

My life line would be a static kernmantle rope!

From: 2Wild Bill
20-Sep-22

2Wild Bill's embedded Photo
2Wild Bill's embedded Photo
Here's a photo of what I was explaining about the tied knot being across the turns. In this case I twisted the loop twice around the carabiner to keep it snug.

From: Overland
20-Sep-22
As a climber I found it interesting that the pre-tied prusik knot/cord on Millennium's included lifeline is extremely large in diameter. Climbers use prusiks frequently when rappelling to back up the belay/rappel device. We use very skinny cord for this. I think I personally use 4mm or 5mm. 6mm would be more than ample. Go into any climbing store and they will have spools of accessory cord that you can purchase by the foot. Make certain you do not go to Home Depot or similar and buy cotton core rope. You want an actual climbing-type rope.

From: Zbone
20-Sep-22
The Prusik has to be smaller diameter than the tether, if I remember right...

20-Sep-22
Eastern woods outdoors. It’s called a hollow block. You can buy it in several sizes. I use an 8mm. It’ll be listed as a hollow block on his webpage.

From: Rocky D
20-Sep-22

Rocky D's Link
“Prusik Loop Material Guide

Prusik loop material should be approximately 60% to 80% of the standing line diameter. If the hitch is too small, the hitch will be tight, making it difficult to free and then move the loop. If the diameter is too large, the hitch will not tighten up enough to grip and will slip. Flexibility is important. A cord that is too stiff will not allow the hitch to tighten enough to grip the standing line. In life safety applications such as rescue and belays, many authorities recommend the use of two tandem triple wrap Prusik hitches. Many authorities suggest using 8mm cord for 1/2? rope and 7mm cord for 7/16? ropes. It is ultimately your responsibility to determine, select and use accessory cord and rope combinations that will work reliably in any life supporting situation, taking into account your experience, level of training and environmental conditions.“

Check out the link! Your prusik rope should not be to small and it should be a softer material!

From: Bow Bullet
20-Sep-22
A prusik used as a "third hand" back-up for rappeling doesn't see much load, it does its job providing enough braking so the belay device can do the primary braking. That's why it can be small diameter cord in that situation.

In the lifeline configuration, the prusik sees a much higher load when it arrests a fall. The more slack in the tether from your belt to the lifeline, the more shock load to the system if a fall occurs. In my opinion, I would want the lifeline to be 10 or 11mm dynamic, single rated, kernmantle rope and the prusik loop to be about 3-4mm smaller than the lifeline but not less than 7mm. Also, I prefer the the loop to be tied with a double fisherman's knot. But there are various ways to skin the cat.

From: Medicinemann
20-Sep-22
I'll agree with Rocky D that the dynamic rope (aka prussic knot) needs to be "soft" rope so it can "bite" into the static line (actual lifeline that extends towards the ground). It also helps on days when the rope may have gotten wet, or frozen, if you can just flex it a couple times to make sure that it can "grip" in the unlike event that you need it to do so.

From: Lewis
20-Sep-22
I tie my own so far so good good luck Lewis

From: Rocky D
21-Sep-22
“ wet, or frozen”

Medicineman, thanks for the flashback talking about knots and ropes.

It went something like “ 120 foot long, made of nylon with a tensile strength of 3840lbs with a right hand lay, has 1/3 stretch factor, and loses 18% of its strength when it becomes WET, FROZEN or KNOTTED!

P. S. I heard this first standing on Sheridan glacier, Cordova, Alaska, July 1978!

From: 2Wild Bill
21-Sep-22
RockyD,

Thanks for the guide. I use 1/2" or 7/16" static line for my tether and safety line so my 9mm Prusik is sized about right.

From: Rocky D
21-Sep-22
Bill, thx! Just trying to separate fact from opinion.

Mike

From: Michael
22-Sep-22

Michael's embedded Photo
Michael's embedded Photo
I fell tonight.

It was when I was climbing down. Had my linesman belt on while descending. One of my sticks must have worked loose and when I put my weight on it it fell.

No prusik knot was used instead I use an ascender. Other then the boys getting banged up when I hit the tree all is good. Good thing is they are getting over it already. Lol.

From: Medicinemann
23-Sep-22
Suspension trauma is a very under-rated downfall of a lifeline (yes, the pun is intentional) but the statement is no joke.....and it certainly beats the alternative.

From: Rocky D
23-Sep-22
Ascender is technically a better option but doesn’t have any give so it will feel more like a sudden stop!

This is where I would prefer to have the harness with the break away sections and or a dynamic rope that has some give in it!

From: Michael
23-Sep-22
Other then banging into the tree last night. I didn’t feel much of anything. I was wearing my Tethrd saddle and had the linesman rope wrapped around the tree with an ascender on one end. Total distance I fell was around a foot.

There has been a couple of fall protection seminars I have been to over the years. The ones that always hurt the worse were when you simulated being tied off at your feet and then stepping off. That would put your fall at around 6’. The easiest ones were when you were hooked up to a retractable. You don’t fall at all then. It grabs instantly.

From: Rocky D
23-Sep-22
I had a pin break four or five years ago and I fell maybe 2 to 3 feet and it was a pretty good jolt!

That was in warm weather, hate to think about it if I’ had been sitting in the cold for several hours!

From: 2Wild Bill
23-Sep-22
Michael,

So the way you describe your linesman belt, it goes around the tree and one side is attached with an ascender? How different is that from a simple waist belt that has a ring on both sides with a rope going around the tree?

From: 2Wild Bill
23-Sep-22
Of course I'm glad to hear you're OK.

From: Michael
23-Sep-22
Bill,

I mentioned linesman belt when I should have said linesman rope. That is my mistake.

I was wearing a Tethrd tree saddle. It has a loop on each hip for a linesman rope just like a harbess would have.

I attach one end of the rope to my tree saddle with a carabiner and the other end I use an ascender instead of a prusik knot to a carabiner and attach it to my saddle.

While climbing and descending the tree I am constantly adjusting the rope length with the ascender for a comfortable length to work with. With the ascender it is easier and quicker using one hand then a prusik knot.

24-Sep-22

WV Mountaineer's embedded Photo
WV Mountaineer's embedded Photo
Bill, the ropeman Michael is referring to is in the pic. You can’t really see it good. But, it’s on the lineman’s belt daisy chained to me lineman’s loop. Only photo I got of it.

I didn’t take the pic for that. Zoom in. Like clock work, I dropped an arrow out on the first hint of the year. I’m consistently t if nothing else.

From: Rocky D
25-Sep-22

Rocky D's embedded Photo
Rocky D's embedded Photo
10 feet just doesn’t do it for me!

From: Ambush
25-Sep-22
I found out last week that pine pitch on the main rope can seize the prussic. Not handy!

From: 2Wild Bill
26-Sep-22
RockyD, Pick another location, those trees don't produce the nuts deer like. :)

From: Rocky D
26-Sep-22
Bill, the nuts (acorns) are two hundred yards behind me on private land.

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