Moultrie Mobile
lightest pack saw for skull capping
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Sivart 03-Dec-22
bowhunt 03-Dec-22
Corax_latrans 03-Dec-22
Sivart 03-Dec-22
SaddleReaper 03-Dec-22
DonVathome 08-Dec-22
bowyer45 08-Dec-22
walleyes 08-Dec-22
Shug 08-Dec-22
Bowaddict 08-Dec-22
Shug 08-Dec-22
Tilzbow 08-Dec-22
ElkNut1 08-Dec-22
Corax_latrans 09-Dec-22
DanaC 09-Dec-22
OTC_Bowhunter 09-Dec-22
Franklin 09-Dec-22
Ambush 09-Dec-22
Bowaddict 09-Dec-22
Rob in VT 11-Dec-22
Matt 11-Dec-22
llamapacker 18-Dec-22
Beendare 19-Dec-22
>>>---WW----> 19-Dec-22
>>>---WW----> 19-Dec-22
SB 24-Dec-22
Stix 26-Dec-22
Stix 26-Dec-22
Rock 26-Dec-22
Tracker 01-Jan-23
DanaC 02-Jan-23
t-roy 02-Jan-23
DanaC 02-Jan-23
Jethro 02-Jan-23
Ambush 02-Jan-23
DanaC 09-Jan-23
Zbone 09-Jan-23
Ambush 09-Jan-23
From: Sivart
03-Dec-22
Looking for a lightweight option. I have the gerber exchange a blade, but I'm afraid it will fall apart if I ever had to cap a skull with it. Would like to stay around 6 oz if possible.

From: bowhunt
03-Dec-22
I’ve had a Bahco folding saw for a long time. The weight is in the ballpark of what your looking for.

Very durable, and works great on bone or wood.

03-Dec-22
Cable saw. Weighs next to nothing.

From: Sivart
03-Dec-22
which cable saw? I had one 15 years ago, and it broke almost instantly.

I've looked at the Bahco. It's on my short list.

From: SaddleReaper
03-Dec-22
Silky Pocketboy 130 is 6oz, and the best (pocket -sized) folding saw money can buy imo. If a dual purpose saw for wood and bone is what you need then this would work. I recommend the curved blade. Its scary sharp and fast cutting.

From: DonVathome
08-Dec-22
I second the cable saw, I am nervous to use it as a main saw so I only carry it as a backup. I bought the "wire" online, it was meant for cutting domestic sheep horns down. I carry 2 key rings to wrap the wire around and use like handles.

I had a cheap wire saw I got desperate and used on my ak moose after I broke my folding saw. It worked way better then anything else - anything, until it broke. As I got nearly through I think the antler "sagged" into the cut and caused the wire to bind and break. This wire was a cheap wire I got many years ago - not the current one I got for bone.

It was shocking how fast it was cutting before it broke, again this was a cheap wire I had for emergency use in my backpack.

From: bowyer45
08-Dec-22
for moose and elk size game, get yourself a crosscut carpenters wood saw , cut the blade down to an overall length about 16 inches, cut or grind the handle of excess wood to lighten. I have used that saw on many elk and moose and it is the best for bone, You need a good comfortable handle and those saws are the best.

From: walleyes
08-Dec-22
I have used the bahco folding saw for the last 2 years and it works to get the job done on bone. But it was a pain and want something better. I put a Wyoming saw on my Christmas list to try as they seem to cut much faster and better. Wish there was a lightweight handle as that is where most of the weight comes from on the Wyoming saw

From: Shug
08-Dec-22
Dakota saw comes in a couple different sizes and are super sturdy…

From: Bowaddict
08-Dec-22
Second the Wyoming saw, just so much easier to do the job! Leave it in the truck and take it back in for the second meat load and finish job. Takes seconds to cut off skull plate or heads, and although it’s longer in its carry pouch it’s not that heavy for pack-in hunts.

From: Shug
08-Dec-22
Wyoming saw comes in a couple different sizes and are super sturdy…

From: Tilzbow
08-Dec-22

Tilzbow's Link
This little dude by Outdoor Edge. An outfitter/guide friend turned me onto it a few years ago and he’s still using the same one he originally showed me back then. I’m sure he field dresses more elk and deer in year than most of us will do in 10. I’ve been surprised how well mine’s held up since I bought it two years ago.

From: ElkNut1
08-Dec-22
Nothing but the WY Saw, the rest will leave you frustrated, tired & bloody/bruised knuckles when removing rack from a bull.

ElkNut

09-Dec-22
“which cable saw? “

I never went to fancy with it… The thing is, if you bend it over whatever it is that you’re cutting, it’s going to heat up and snap.

You just have to make sure that you keep the cable as straight as possible, which is why a lot of guys will string it on a green limb to create a bow saw. And we are bowhunters, right? So that’s what we ought to be using!

But seriously, they don’t like to be bent over whatever it is that they’re cutting. Keep it as straight as possible, and it should hold up just fine.

From: DanaC
09-Dec-22

DanaC's Link
Comparisons -

https://eatelkmeat.com/gear/bone-saw/

09-Dec-22

OTC_Bowhunter's Link
I see no need to carry a bone saw in my pack all the time. Keep one of these in your truck (see link). During your pack out, the head should be your last trip. So on one of the many prior trips, grab the saw and take it back to your head, bone it out and head for the truck.

From: Franklin
09-Dec-22
I have an older WY, it's the size of a large knife sheath....you can even put it on your belt or molly it to your pack. I had a guide offer me a pretty penny for it as the particular WY is no longer being made.

I cringe when I see guys packing out heads with skulls in, especially elk and moose. All hunters should learn how to cape out a head, it is so easy you will kick yourself after you do one.

People say "my taxidermist says....." which is nonsense.....you should see the stuff that we/they can fix. Cut close to the skull, leave plenty of eye, lip, nose skin and dig out the glands below the eyes carefully and you're good to go.

This goes for bears also; we lose so many bears due to face slip because people leave the skull in the bear. Even if you freeze it, it takes way longer than you think to get that head frozen.

From: Ambush
09-Dec-22
A saw that would work for cutting bones, like ribs, probably won't be the saw that you want to cap a skull with. If you really want to cap a skull then a carpenters saw is definitely best and the longer the better. I've done lots of moose. The Silky folding saws saws are definitely way above the Gerber's and such. Took me awhile to spent the coin to find that out.

I can't imagine why anyone would want a saw to cut through leg bones in the field, or the pelvis for that matter. If you want to cut the ribs off intact, or brisket or a section of spine for bone in prime rib, then the folding Silky is your best bet for weight and efficiency. You can do the capping with the Silky, just not as easily and evenly as the hand saw.

Capping without caping is a pain. And if you are caping, then removing the lower jaw and excess meat (with a knife) and you'll have offset the weight of a bigger, capable saw anyway. And you'll have no scrapped knuckles or bent saw blades.

From: Bowaddict
09-Dec-22
I know there are saws similar and probably as good, but with a Wyoming saw I can have an elk done in about the same amount of time it takes to put it together(which isn’t long)! No busted up knuckles or bent blades, just a good clean quick cut.

From: Rob in VT
11-Dec-22
Have had my WY saw for about 20 years now.

From: Matt
11-Dec-22
“I can't imagine why anyone would want a saw to cut through leg bones in the field, or the pelvis for that matter.”

I have been wondering this for years and still haven’t received an answer more substantive than “that is how we’ve always done it.”

From: llamapacker
18-Dec-22
Wyoming saw. The larger version for camp or the truck, and the smaller version for my pack. Bill

From: Beendare
19-Dec-22
I carry that small Silky saw but its for building blinds. I just take the skull off with a knife at the last vertebra like the guys above

19-Dec-22
Wyoming saw is good. However, it is heavy compared to most anything else. And hope you don't lose any parts in the snow while putting it together with cold hands.

Personally, I prefer a Bacho or Silk.

19-Dec-22
Wyoming saw is good. However, it is heavy compared to most anything else. And hope you don't lose any parts in the snow while putting it together with cold hands.

Personally, I prefer a Bacho or Silk.

From: SB
24-Dec-22
Why a pack saw?...Poaching??

From: Stix
26-Dec-22
I have used the Gerber exchange a blade for skull capping multiple times. It didn't fall apart.

From: Stix
26-Dec-22
I have used the Gerber exchange a blade for skull capping multiple times. It didn't fall apart.

From: Rock
26-Dec-22
I have not capped any skulls for many many years now as I do Eruo's on everything now. Do have a Wyoming saw that I have had for probably 20+ years now and am not sure I have ever used it, it says in my truck all the time in case I do need it sometime.

From: Tracker
01-Jan-23
What Bowyer45 said!

From: DanaC
02-Jan-23
Does anyone have/use the longer version of the Silky saw? Looking to upgrade my cheap 'trail maintenance' pocket saw. Thanks.

From: t-roy
02-Jan-23
DanaC………..I have the “BIGBOY 2000” folding saw. At least I think that’s what it’s called. It has a 14” blade. I’ve had it a few years, and I’d highly recommend it. Super sharp and cuts like a dream. The kerf is much better than on the other folding saws that I’ve used in the past. Kinda spendy, but well worth it, IMO. They make shorter versions as well.

From: DanaC
02-Jan-23
Thanks! I usually bring two tools when doing trail work, loppers and a pocket saw, or a buck saw and pocket snips. My old pocket saw is cheap crap.

From: Jethro
02-Jan-23

Jethro's embedded Photo
Jethro's embedded Photo
Buddy gifted me this saw. Looks like it should work great. Fine teeth, sturdy, long enough stroke, only 7.5oz.

Will stay in truck or camp and go in on 2nd trip hauling meat. Our group has a big Wyoming too and it’s great. Had the unusual situation this past season where multiple guys needed a saw at same time.

We’ve been known to take a lower leg or 4 off with the saw too.

From: Ambush
02-Jan-23
On a six inch tree, I'd bet t-roy's Silky will get through a tree quicker than a quad sized chain saw if you went from "oh crap, tree on the trial" to cut through. If the chainsaw is an easy starter, then he'll catch up on the second cut if needed. I think mine has an eight inch blade and its always in my pack except mountain hunting. Super sharp and super handy! Unfortunately, now super expensive!

From: DanaC
09-Jan-23

DanaC's embedded Photo
DanaC's embedded Photo

DanaC's Link
Looking at the Silky folding saw page, and all the blade lengths are in millimeters. Being 'metric challenged' I made a simple conversion table. Most all lengths are available in straight or curved blade, regular or fine teeth. Based on this I figure the 210 is about what I need.

From: Zbone
09-Jan-23
Any you guys ever try Outdoor Edge Flip n' Zip folding saw? I just weighed mine and it weighs a whopping 2.4 oz or 2.75 oz with sheath...

From: Ambush
09-Jan-23
Dana, if buying another one, I'd buy the 240 or 300. More teeth and cut per stroke and you could tackle a pretty big tree if you had to.

  • Sitka Gear