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Best rangefinder on the market
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Jeff.Thomp 05-Dec-22
Grey Ghost 05-Dec-22
PushCoArcher 05-Dec-22
midwest 05-Dec-22
Charlie Rehor 05-Dec-22
Dale06 05-Dec-22
c5ken 05-Dec-22
Beendare 05-Dec-22
HDE 05-Dec-22
LUNG$HOT 05-Dec-22
Matt 05-Dec-22
Grey Ghost 05-Dec-22
LUNG$HOT 05-Dec-22
Basil 06-Dec-22
Groundhunter 06-Dec-22
PushCoArcher 06-Dec-22
Grey Ghost 06-Dec-22
Mule Power 06-Dec-22
BOHNTR 06-Dec-22
Matt 06-Dec-22
drycreek 06-Dec-22
Basil 06-Dec-22
Grey Ghost 06-Dec-22
lame crowndip 07-Dec-22
From: Jeff.Thomp
05-Dec-22
I have a Leupold 1600 and like it but its burning through batteries at an alarming rate this year. Looking to invest in the best on the market and would love suggestions.

From: Grey Ghost
05-Dec-22
I don't know if it's the "best" because I haven't used them all, but I love my Leica Rangemaster. The optics were better than any of the other offerings at Cabelas. They have the red colored readout, which is easier to see in certain light conditions, and they have angle compensation for both bow and rifle. Battery life is excellent.

Matt

From: PushCoArcher
05-Dec-22

PushCoArcher's embedded Photo
PushCoArcher's embedded Photo
If we're talking best Swarovski makes a pretty sweet set of binos with built in rangefinder only $3700 before tax. Knowing your budget will help with suggestions. Leica makes a quality products and I've been hearing good things about the sig sauer rangefinder especially the higher end models. Replaced my Leupold rangefinder recently was unhappy with it's performance with a vortex ranger. I'd probably go with the sig if I had it to do over again.

From: midwest
05-Dec-22
Bushnell Broadhead for bowhunting has been excellent for me this season. Read out is red at low light, black when it's bright. Other nice features and modes.

05-Dec-22
Get one that illuminates the yardage in the dark. I had an Opti-logic that did this but my current Vortex does not.

From: Dale06
05-Dec-22
I’ve used a Leica 900 for more than 10 years. It’s been flawless, is small and light, and very easy on batteries. It does not have angle compensation, and I’m fine with that. I have handled several of the bino/RF combined units and found them to be heavy. If I were buying today, Leica, in the $5-600 range.

From: c5ken
05-Dec-22
Ive used the Leica 10x42 Geovid rangefinder bino for years... Zero issues About $1,500

From: Beendare
05-Dec-22
My Nikon, Leopold RX and the old brick Leica I have- all very good.

From: HDE
05-Dec-22
Sig. If it's laser rangefinding you're after, check them out.

From: LUNG$HOT
05-Dec-22
Don’t think Nikon makes them anymore but my old Nikon is sweet.

From: Matt
05-Dec-22
I prefer my Sig 2400 over others I have used, but has anyone found a RF that works in fog? Last week I was trying to range a buck in really thick fog and the readings I got were along the lines of 13, 15, 14, 13, 13, 59, 13, 14. The buck was at 59 and barely visible in the fog. A friend has an old Nikon that works perfectly fine. but I've not found a currently manufactured RF that seems to.

From: Grey Ghost
05-Dec-22
I think it's physics, Matt. Laser range finders are severely limited by heavy fog, rain, snow, dust, etc.. It's a beam of light passing thru air. Think about how a flashlight does in those conditions...same thing.

Matt

From: LUNG$HOT
05-Dec-22
^^^ GG has it right. Fog, rain, snow etc no matter what the brand will interfere with that beam and produce muddled readings depending how severe the obstruction. I agree with getting a model that has a red LCD for low light conditions. My only complaint with the Nikon. Has a black readout.

From: Basil
06-Dec-22
Just returned a Sig kilo rangefinder. Battery would read 1/3 so I replaced it twice with same result. No matter what I ranged it would not read over 9.6 yards. Disappointing, it was on a good sale and I had heard good reviews. My Nikon Archers choice rangefinder had served me well for around 20 years but did not survive another 25 foot drop. Have a Vortex now, seems nice but time will tell.

From: Groundhunter
06-Dec-22
Sold my Vortex. Good but black and white. Bought a Sig. Good red color. Both work well

From: PushCoArcher
06-Dec-22
My new vortex has a red display.

From: Grey Ghost
06-Dec-22
A few weeks ago my young hunting buddy missed high on a good buck two mornings in a row out of the same natural ground blind. Both shots were inside of 40 yards, which is easily within his range. He was crushed.

I attributed the first miss to buck fever, even though he said he was calm and made a good shot. After the second miss, I suspected something on his bow had moved. Nope, he stepped up to my 30 yard marker on my target butt and drilled 2 shots dead center.

On a hunch, I asked to see his new Nikon range finder. I first checked that it was reading yards, not meters, which it was. When I ranged the target at 30 yards, the Nikon read 37 yards! We double checked several other distances, and each time his Nikon was off by 7-8 yards compared to my Leica Rangemaster. Needless to say, he took the Nikon unit back to Cabelas.

Have any of you ever seen a rangefinder that was off by that much?

Matt

From: Mule Power
06-Dec-22
I love my Leica. A friend has a Swarovski and it’s no better.

From: BOHNTR
06-Dec-22
Leica

From: Matt
06-Dec-22
"I think it's physics, Matt. Laser range finders are severely limited by heavy fog, rain, snow, dust, etc.. It's a beam of light passing thru air."

That would make sense except for certain models of RF's (notably older Nikons) were far more reliable in fog. A buddy actually used to carry two RF's when guiding clients in case he encountered fog. Perhaps there have been "improvements" to extend distance or improve accuracy that have diminished fog performance?

"On a hunch, I asked to see his new Nikon range finder. I first checked that it was reading yards, not meters, which it was. When I ranged the target at 30 yards, the Nikon read 37 yards! We double checked several other distances, and each time his Nikon was off by 7-8 yards compared to my Leica Rangemaster. Needless to say, he took the Nikon unit back to Cabelas."

I've never seen a RF be that far off, but it also isn't an issue if you sight your bow into your rangefinder - which should be SOP for all bowhunters.

If I am hunting with someone and they ask me to range for them, as a matter of practice I will have both of us range a couple of objects at varying distances to determine whether there is any difference between our rangefinders. It is usually 0-1 but I have seen a difference of as much as 4 at 40 at yards

From: drycreek
06-Dec-22
I’ve only owned three, a Bushnell, a Leupold, and my current Nikon. Of the three I prefer the Nikon 1000 that I have now.

From: Basil
06-Dec-22
Love my Leica Geovids but I feel it’s too much for most whitetail hunting. Love them for Western hunting. It’s a dilemma to decide whether to carry one unit or both bino & rangefinder. For me the difficulty of one handed operation with ranging binoculars while holding a bow is enough reason for me to prefer carrying both in the whitetail woods.

From: Grey Ghost
06-Dec-22
"I've never seen a RF be that far off, but it also isn't an issue if you sight your bow into your rangefinder - which should be SOP for all bowhunters.

I agree in principle. In this case, we sighted in his bow on my home range which has all the yardages accurately marked. We never thought to check the accuracy of his brand new range finder.

I also think it should be SOP for all bowhunters to develop their internal range finder. Years of shooting 3D tournaments honed my eyes and brain well for judging yardage. I can usually guess within a yard or 2 out to 50. Unfortunately, my young hunting buddy hasn't gotten there, yet, so he relied on a defective range finder that cost him a dandy Mule deer buck...twice. I guess you can live or die by technology.

Matt

07-Dec-22
Grey...I have a nikon that is off by a bunch. I'm using my Vortex and it's right on the button. I don't remember where I got the nikon so I don't imagine they will stand behind it.

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