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Meat grinder blades
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
wisconsinteacher 21-Jan-23
RJ Hunt 21-Jan-23
cnelk 21-Jan-23
KSflatlander 21-Jan-23
INbowdude 21-Jan-23
[email protected] 21-Jan-23
timex 21-Jan-23
wisconsinteacher 21-Jan-23
Hunts_with_stick 21-Jan-23
cnelk 21-Jan-23
timex 21-Jan-23
HiMtnHnter 21-Jan-23
wisconsinteacher 22-Jan-23
Jeff Durnell 22-Jan-23
fuzzy 22-Jan-23
fuzzy 22-Jan-23
HDE 23-Jan-23
Grey Ghost 23-Jan-23
cnelk 23-Jan-23
AaronShort 23-Jan-23
HDE 23-Jan-23
Lawdog 24-Jan-23
PTArcher 24-Jan-23
wisconsinteacher 24-Jan-23
HDE 24-Jan-23
grape 25-Jan-23
WV Mountaineer 25-Jan-23
Lawdog 25-Jan-23
fuzzy 25-Jan-23
Inshart 26-Jan-23
Jethro 26-Jan-23
21-Jan-23
I just wanted to share something I learned today. I knew that the blade on #22 meat grinders needed to be sharpened but I did not realize that the grinding plate needed to be lapped as well. I bought a flat ceramic tile and some 80 and 180 sandpaper and polished both the blade and plate. After that the grinder worked a lot easier and quicker.

Just and FYI to those of you who make meat products at home.

From: RJ Hunt
21-Jan-23
Cool tip thank you

From: cnelk
21-Jan-23
Yep. I just sharpened my blade and a plates the other day. Used my Gatco diamond stone

From: KSflatlander
21-Jan-23
Thanks for the tip. I’m way overdue

From: INbowdude
21-Jan-23
Thanks, Matt!

21-Jan-23
Yea, I sharpen my blades each time with a fine diamond file. Makes a huge difference. Partly freezing the meat and cutting into grinding size strips before grinding, make a good difference.

From: timex
21-Jan-23

timex's embedded Photo
timex's embedded Photo
Not to argue but these plates and blade are roughly 10 years old and have never been touched. I do an average of 200lbs of burger per season. I always double grind using the large hole plate first alternating deer & pork then switch to the small hole plate and re grind. I can do 50lbs in an hour no problem.

It's my opinion that the first grind with the large hole plate is just so much easier on the grinder that it's worth the added time to double grind. And if your adding any seasoning or beef, pork, whatever, mixing the rough grind then doing a second grind through the small hole plate gives very uniform results.

The blade and plates are wet cause they were in the dishwasher. I did a 50lb 70/30 venison to pork batch earlier today.

21-Jan-23
My dad got the grinder in 2007 and today was the first time I touched the blade and plate. The original blade has a huge burr on it still so I used a new one today with the lapped plates. We average 100-200 pounds of product each year. I really enjoy making good tasting meats.

21-Jan-23
I second what times said

From: cnelk
21-Jan-23
Timex - don’t be stubborn. Sharpen them and you’ll notice a difference

From: timex
21-Jan-23
cnelk.... can't argue with that. I just never have problems doing the large hole plate first.

From: HiMtnHnter
21-Jan-23
Sharpening sure ain't gonna hurt nothing, especially the blade.

22-Jan-23
I never had problems with the larger plate. It was always the small plate that caused issues. After sharpening them the small plate worked like a champ yesterday.

From: Jeff Durnell
22-Jan-23
I use the large hole plate first too. But still keep all plates and blades sharp on both of my grinders, slicer, and all butchering knives. The sharper the better.

From: fuzzy
22-Jan-23
They do need sharpening occasionally. I Run mine lightly over the Arkansas extra fine oilstone once a year, I keep a few extra blades and plates.

From: fuzzy
22-Jan-23
A lot of the variation in opinions may be attributed to the volume of work done per year. I process 15 to 25 deer a year and at least a couple of hogs as well as the occasional bear. 70% of the meat goes through the grinder. I want my grinder to run as smoothly and quickly as possible. Yes I probably "waste" a few minutes a year honing blades which may not need it. Then again I think I make it up in total time spent at grinder. If a freshly sharp blade saves me 15 seconds per animal on 30 animals I've more than made up for the 3 minutes spent honing.

From: HDE
23-Jan-23
Doing an elk or two per year, my blade won't dull anytime soon. I also don't use the "stock" blade it came with, so I do have a brand new as backup.

From: Grey Ghost
23-Jan-23
When I started grinding my own meat, one of the first things I learned was the direction that the blade is installed is critical. It seems obvious now, but on my first few attempts I had the blade on backwards. I thought my grinder was defective until I had my "duh" moment. I've never sharpened mine, but I'm going to now. Thanks for the tip.

Matt

From: cnelk
23-Jan-23
I process some animals that have been shot with rifles. Due to the expansion / separation of the bullets in the meat, this will also dull your blade/plates

From: AaronShort
23-Jan-23
One of the best practices I've picked up on is to keep the throat, auger, blades and die plates in the freezer prior to use. And the meat right around freezing. Never had any clogging issues after I started doing this.

From: HDE
23-Jan-23
I spray all the moving parts with food grade white oil prior to use as well. Helps with wear.

From: Lawdog
24-Jan-23
More to the effort. I sharpen the blades and lap the plate, particularly a new blade or plate. I use a sharpie pen to color the blade or plate and use a fine piece of emory cloth. That way you know that the plate is "level" without any gaps and the blade is true to the plate. If you still have ink on the blade or plate, keep going until you don't.

From: PTArcher
24-Jan-23
I get sharpening the blade. Can someone explain what lapping the plate is? Thanks

24-Jan-23
PTArcher, the blade works best when going across a flat smooth plate. By lapping the plate, the blade will have a flat surface to go across and be more efficient. Over time you will notice that the plate will get small grooves and wear marks in it. By removing them, the grinder will cut better.

From: HDE
24-Jan-23
Lapping a plate is resurfacing it for true dimensions, not for leveling.

It's like turning rotors when doing a break job on a car.

From: grape
25-Jan-23
Great topic. What are your thoughts on using the the two different plates for the finished product. I have felt that when I use the smaller diameter plate my hamburger gets mushy. Am I doing something wrong? Or is that the way it should be when you’re making certain products. Let me say it this way. When I grind with the small diameter plate for just hamburger….it’s too mushy for my liking. Love to hear your thoughts. Thanks Greg.

25-Jan-23
Years ago there was a thread about double grinding. I was asked if caused my grind to be mushy. I answered no because I didn’t think it did. Well, I stopped double grinding and only run it through once. It makes a much better product.

From: Lawdog
25-Jan-23
My grinder came with large and small plates. So, I double grinded the meat for burger. Got tired of that, so I got the medium plate. Perfect. However, I may or may not double grind when making sauage.

From: fuzzy
25-Jan-23
I double grind sausage more to mix than for texture

From: Inshart
26-Jan-23
Great tips, time for me to address my pre-grinding process.

From: Jethro
26-Jan-23
I have double ground before, but not always. Last time I did my first double grind using the small plate for both grinds. I like the finish product I got.

Have never sharpened my blades or plates, so that is on the to do list.

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