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Schoolkid munched by mtn lion
cougar
Contributors to this thread:
Beendare 01-Feb-23
Woods Walker 01-Feb-23
dmandoes 01-Feb-23
drycreek 01-Feb-23
LBshooter 01-Feb-23
bigswivle 01-Feb-23
HDE 01-Feb-23
SteveB 02-Feb-23
scentman 02-Feb-23
Bigdog 21 02-Feb-23
KHNC 02-Feb-23
Gunny 02-Feb-23
fuzzy 02-Feb-23
Keith 02-Feb-23
Corax_latrans 02-Feb-23
Corax_latrans 02-Feb-23
Corax_latrans 02-Feb-23
Bou’bound 03-Feb-23
StickFlicker 03-Feb-23
Bou'bound 04-Feb-23
Jaquomo 04-Feb-23
BOWUNTR 04-Feb-23
Corax_latrans 04-Feb-23
MA-PAdeerslayer 05-Feb-23
Bou'bound 05-Feb-23
orionsbrother 05-Feb-23
Corax_latrans 05-Feb-23
Matt 05-Feb-23
PushCoArcher 05-Feb-23
Bou’bound 05-Feb-23
PushCoArcher 05-Feb-23
Bou’bound 05-Feb-23
From: Beendare
01-Feb-23
Yesterday in CA, schoolkid walking a rural rd S of Half Moon Bay munched on by a Mountain lion. Not much in the initial report, kid is in surgery but expected to recover.

Thats what we get when antis dictate F&G policy. Lions are a big problem in CA…the F&G tries to keep it under wraps but these stories leak out. My buddies goat killed on his porch in Mckolume Hill a few yrs ago…the GW told him to keep it quiet and no pics of the dead lion the houndsman caught 400y from his house.

From: Woods Walker
01-Feb-23
Hey it's OK, there's the whacko group is going to "herbivorize" predators ! No problem!

From: dmandoes
01-Feb-23
They will probably build a $90,000,000 road crossing for the lion.

From: drycreek
01-Feb-23
Just another reason in a long list of reasons not to ever even visit Kalifornia.

From: LBshooter
01-Feb-23
I'm sure that the town and school board will prohibit kids from walki to school, aka , reeducation camps. Also, it's not the lions fault, it's our fault because we continue to promote global warming and. The lions brain is being boiled. A damn shame that kids are allowed to walk freely in this country, When will the madness stop.

From: bigswivle
01-Feb-23
#schoollunch

I am going to hell

From: HDE
01-Feb-23
Too bad the anti-predator hunting crowd isn't the one to get munched.

Just sayin' what others are thinkin'...

From: SteveB
02-Feb-23

SteveB's Link
He survived link attached

From: scentman
02-Feb-23
Maybe a better choice of words in the future... just a thought.

From: Bigdog 21
02-Feb-23
Live in the mountains and get bitten by a mountain lion cub , knowing they live there, hmmm. But the jury was already in above.

From: KHNC
02-Feb-23
"Live in the mountains and get bitten by a mountain lion cub , knowing they live there, hmmm. But the jury was already in above"

This what you would say if some young gang member shot you?

From: Gunny
02-Feb-23
Cool story to tell years later.

"Oh yeah, you think your tough? I remember this one time when I was 5, this mountain lion attacked me............"

From: fuzzy
02-Feb-23
Wow. Callous group here. Praying for the child's full recovery.

From: Keith
02-Feb-23
The wildlife "expert" is blaming the kid. The kid's 5 years old, probably 50 pounds at the most. An easy meal for any predator.

02-Feb-23
#50 at 5 years old?? That’d be a whole different species from my family. I think I was probably 10. My older son tried out for high school hockey at 14… weighed all of #85….

I looked it up. #43 is pretty average for 5, so maybe.

02-Feb-23
It ain’t the size of the dog in the fight….

02-Feb-23

Corax_latrans's embedded Photo
Corax_latrans's embedded Photo
It’s the size of the fight in the dog….

From: Bou’bound
03-Feb-23
The title of this thread is a bit cavalier. Nothing to minimize and it's not the boys fault he lives in a place adults have ruined. Not sure the purpose of minimizing victim impact in any way.

From: StickFlicker
03-Feb-23
I read that the G&F kills more problem lions per year now than they ever killed with hunters before the ban, but they keep that quiet too.

From: Bou'bound
04-Feb-23
It would be wonderful to k is if that is true. Reading it does not validate it. How powerful would that be if it was accurate. Wow

From: Jaquomo
04-Feb-23
Here in CO the CPW euthanized more sows with cubs than were ever mistakenly killed by spring bear hunters baiting. But that's apparently ok with the general public because at least nobody is enjoying the killing of them.

Same thing will happen when they outlaw lion hunting. 500 lions are killed by hunters every year here, and the population appears to be expanding slightly. But as the ARAs tell us, lions will naturally adjust their litter sizes when they overpopulated. Um, no, they just move into cities and the suburban dwellers call CPW out to fix it.

From: BOWUNTR
04-Feb-23
"Since Proposition 117 passed, around 100 mountain lions have been killed each year via the depredation permit system — nearly four times the average number of lions killed each year under such permits prior to the ballot measure, according to The Bee's analysis of state records.Feb 28, 2020" Ed F

04-Feb-23
I saw a follow-up on this story…. The FishCops went out to remove the attacking lion and the private landowners refused access. So that one is still out there.

Nice.

05-Feb-23
Bet they wouldn’t refuse access if it was their 5 year old that got chewed on….then again it’s California so maybe they still would…

From: Bou'bound
05-Feb-23
Bowhuner. That may be saying 4x as many depredation kills

If so that is different than what was taken under legal hunting tags when they were offered.

Normally there are regular tags and special depredation permits.

Would Like to know total Kill pre and post prop 117

05-Feb-23
The “Urban Cat Ladies” have the answers…

From an interview of an author posted on the Mountain Lion Foundation website:

“I’ve often thought of parks hiring “trail walkers” i.e., big college guys with phones who could easily be called if a person sees a lion and is afraid. Or maybe the guys could ride bikes to get them to an emergency situation faster. Simple things like that might prevent a possible tragedy for humans and lion alike.”

Twits.

05-Feb-23
I’m not big and my kid is in college, but that’s a job I would be delighted to sign on for. I’d even make a concession and ride an e-bike.

As long as I get to be adequately equipped with suitable deterrents. A good shotgun and a can of bear spray oughtta do nicely.

From: Matt
05-Feb-23

Matt's Link
“Would Like to know total Kill pre and post prop 117”

The attached link has the number of lions killed “purposefully” (hunting, depredation) and “incidentally” (vehicle strike) from 1906 to 2018. There has in essence been a hunting moratorium since 1972. You can see the average killed on depredation permits in the 5-year period following the moratorium was less than 5/year. During the 5 year period of 2004-2008 it was ~130/year. The last year of sport hunting, 1971, had purposeful take of 35, but that is a big decline from prior year’s 83.

During the past 40 years our black bear population has increased from an estimate 10-15K to as many as 40K.

In the past 30 years our deer population has reduced by close to 50%.

Ballot box biology has proven to be a massive failure.

From: PushCoArcher
05-Feb-23
Meanwhile thousands gather for a memorial for p22 the missing presumed dead mountain lion in L.A. They even have the local elementary kids there singing a memorial song "we love p22". Brainwashing starts with the kids please take a active roll in your child's education don't rely on public schools to form your child. So crazy that such a broken society is part of the same country I live in. Ignorance hidden as wokeness spreads like a cancer.

From: Bou’bound
05-Feb-23
Thousands of people flocked to the Greek Theatre on Saturday to celebrate the life and legacy of P-22, the mountain lion who prowled Griffith Park for more than a decade.

In an event that lasted more than three hours and was streamed online to thousands of viewers, more than four dozen speakers — including scientists, advocates, politicians and celebrities — honored the puma’s far-reaching impact on environmental advocacy and wildlife research.

“You will be remembered as the king of Griffith Park,” said the DJ and music producer Diplo, who held a stuffed P-22 under his arm onstage. “The world has lost a magnificent creature, and the humans of Los Angeles have lost their chance to catch a glimpse of you in the wild.”

The mountain lion surprised the world in 2012 when he appeared in Griffith Park, long considered too small to be home to an apex predator. To reach Los Feliz from his likely birthplace in the Santa Monica Mountains, the cougar would have made an improbable journey through the Hollywood Hills, crossing the 405 and 101 freeways.

P-22’s solitary presence in the heart of Los Angeles became the foundation for an international campaign to build the world’s largest wildlife bridge across the 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills. And his nighttime forays into Los Feliz and Silver Lake, caught on iPhones and Ring doorbell cameras, helped teach Californians that Los Angeles is far wilder than it appears.

“He made us more human, made us connect more to that wild place in ourselves,” said Beth Pratt, a regional executive director for the National Wildlife Federation and the organizer of the event. “We are part of nature, and he reminded us of that.”

Two women, a man with a microphone, and a child wearing cat ears dance on stage with a cutout of a mountain lion behind them Warren Dickson, right, with 3rd Rock Hip Hop, performs.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) Among the nation’s largest service providers to the homeless. PAID CONTENT Among the nation’s largest service providers to the homeless. By LAT Giving Guide December 2022 By Los Angeles Mission Breaking the cycle of homelessness and poverty by stabilizing people in a safe and spiritual environment. The event was mostly festive and celebratory, with guests as varied as a muralist, a puppeteer and three groups of elementary school students. Actor Rainn Wilson, who appeared in one of the first fundraising campaigns for the wildlife bridge, led the crowd in an original song that included the lyrics “P-22, P-22, you left behind a lot of friends and cougar poo.”

P-22 had been acting erratically for more than a month before his death Dec. 17, including attacking three Chihuahuas and killing one. After he was struck by a car in Los Feliz, he was caught by wildlife biologists for an exam. They discovered serious health problems, including a skull fracture, a torn diaphragm and heart, kidney and liver disease.

Chuck Bonham, director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, said he made the “gut-wrenching decision” to euthanize P-22. The crowd was silent as he described holding the cat’s paw during his last days.

“P-22 was beautifully abstract, the essence of the wildness of wild things,” Bonham said. “He was also something very real. I didn’t realize that last aspect until I held his paw in my hand, and the weight overwhelmed me. ... I’ve thought about him a lot since then, trying to soothe my soul.”

Many people are visible in front of a digital display that says "Peace, Love, P-22." Thousands attended the celebration.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) Jeff Sikich, a biologist with the National Park Service, captured P-22 seven times over 11 years to replace his tracking collar and perform health exams. He monitored the cougar’s movements daily for more than a decade as part of a federal study of pumas in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Sikich said he had studied hundreds of large carnivores and “never could have imagined that one of these animals could bring so many people together in celebration of coexistence.”

“P-22’s legacy will live on in his contributions to wildlife conservation and our heightened awareness of how to live in harmony with nature,” Sikich said.

Representatives of the Gabrielino Tongva and Chumash tribes compared the loss of native lands to the encroachment of humans on puma territory.

Most pumas in the Los Angeles area live in the Santa Monica Mountains, which are bisected by the 101 Freeway. That almost impenetrable barrier has cut off the cats from a wider gene pool to the north, leading to inbreeding and genetic abnormalities.

Scientific modeling has drawn a dire conclusion: Without interventions such as the wildlife bridge, pumas in the Santa Monica and Santa Ana mountains could be extinct within 50 years.

“The pumas of the Santa Monica Mountains are walking on a knife edge, and their path could lead to extinction or to coexistence,” said David Szymanski, superintendent of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

The National Wildlife Foundation aims to raise $500 million for wildlife crossings in the next five years. The executive director of the Wallis Annenberg Foundation, which contributed millions to the Agoura Hills bridge, has pledged $10 million to the effort.

The Agoura Hills bridge, which broke ground on Earth Day last year, was largely funded by private donations from around the world, including from the foundation of actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

Three men pose with a cutout of a mountain lion From left, Joey Salehi, Jared North and Scotch Crisostomo pose with a cutout of P-22.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) P-22 fans arrived at Saturday’s celebration as early as 9:30 a.m. for the noon event, queuing on the sidewalks of Vermont Avenue to get the best spots in the 5,900-seat theater.

Inside, vendors sold shirts and pins, fans took photos with a cougar cutout, and a Los Feliz resident handed out free copies of a magazine she’d printed at home called “Catamount!”

Kathy Mellon, who wore a blue-and-white sweater showing P-22’s face, drove from Irvine for the event.

“It’s a short drive for P-22, when you think about how far he had to go,” Mellon said.

She has become known among friends and coworkers as a P-22 expert. Her friends, she said, have learned to expect a stuffed puma as a baby gift.

“I hope it brings a little closure,” said Rebecca Damsen of Ohio, who said she and her children had followed P-22’s exploits for years from halfway across the country. Damsen wore a faux fur stole and stuffed ears and a tail, originally from a “Lion King” costume.

A man poses with a photo of a mountain lion prowling past the Hollywood sign, and the same image is on his shirt National Geographic photographer Steve Winter holds his famous photo of P-22.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) The crowd also heard the origin story of P-22’s most iconic moment: a photograph that ran in National Geographic, showing the cat prowling past the Hollywood sign. It took six camera traps and 15 months to get the image, photographer Steve Winter said.

Wearing a shirt bearing the iconic image, Winter snapped photos of the crowd as he left the stage.

Elected officials — including Los Angeles City Councilmember Nithya Raman, state Assemblymember Laura Friedman (D-Glendale), state Sen. Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) and U.S. Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) — also honored their mountain lion constituent.

From: PushCoArcher
05-Feb-23
Bou hadn't realized they put it down. Last I heard was when it was acting "erratically" if you consider a mountain lion living in a metropolis eating chihuahuas erratic. Shocked they didn't spend millions trying to rehabilitate it.

From: Bou’bound
05-Feb-23
Thousands of people flocked to the Greek Theatre on Saturday to celebrate the life and legacy of P-22, the mountain lion who prowled Griffith Park for more than a decade.

In an event that lasted more than three hours and was streamed online to thousands of viewers, more than four dozen speakers — including scientists, advocates, politicians and celebrities — honored the puma’s far-reaching impact on environmental advocacy and wildlife research.

“You will be remembered as the king of Griffith Park,” said the DJ and music producer Diplo, who held a stuffed P-22 under his arm onstage. “The world has lost a magnificent creature, and the humans of Los Angeles have lost their chance to catch a glimpse of you in the wild.”

The mountain lion surprised the world in 2012 when he appeared in Griffith Park, long considered too small to be home to an apex predator. To reach Los Feliz from his likely birthplace in the Santa Monica Mountains, the cougar would have made an improbable journey through the Hollywood Hills, crossing the 405 and 101 freeways.

P-22’s solitary presence in the heart of Los Angeles became the foundation for an international campaign to build the world’s largest wildlife bridge across the 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills. And his nighttime forays into Los Feliz and Silver Lake, caught on iPhones and Ring doorbell cameras, helped teach Californians that Los Angeles is far wilder than it appears.

“He made us more human, made us connect more to that wild place in ourselves,” said Beth Pratt, a regional executive director for the National Wildlife Federation and the organizer of the event. “We are part of nature, and he reminded us of that.”

Two women, a man with a microphone, and a child wearing cat ears dance on stage with a cutout of a mountain lion behind them Warren Dickson, right, with 3rd Rock Hip Hop, performs.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) Among the nation’s largest service providers to the homeless. PAID CONTENT Among the nation’s largest service providers to the homeless. By LAT Giving Guide December 2022 By Los Angeles Mission Breaking the cycle of homelessness and poverty by stabilizing people in a safe and spiritual environment. The event was mostly festive and celebratory, with guests as varied as a muralist, a puppeteer and three groups of elementary school students. Actor Rainn Wilson, who appeared in one of the first fundraising campaigns for the wildlife bridge, led the crowd in an original song that included the lyrics “P-22, P-22, you left behind a lot of friends and cougar poo.”

P-22 had been acting erratically for more than a month before his death Dec. 17, including attacking three Chihuahuas and killing one. After he was struck by a car in Los Feliz, he was caught by wildlife biologists for an exam. They discovered serious health problems, including a skull fracture, a torn diaphragm and heart, kidney and liver disease.

Chuck Bonham, director of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, said he made the “gut-wrenching decision” to euthanize P-22. The crowd was silent as he described holding the cat’s paw during his last days.

“P-22 was beautifully abstract, the essence of the wildness of wild things,” Bonham said. “He was also something very real. I didn’t realize that last aspect until I held his paw in my hand, and the weight overwhelmed me. ... I’ve thought about him a lot since then, trying to soothe my soul.”

Many people are visible in front of a digital display that says "Peace, Love, P-22." Thousands attended the celebration.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) Jeff Sikich, a biologist with the National Park Service, captured P-22 seven times over 11 years to replace his tracking collar and perform health exams. He monitored the cougar’s movements daily for more than a decade as part of a federal study of pumas in the Santa Monica Mountains.

Sikich said he had studied hundreds of large carnivores and “never could have imagined that one of these animals could bring so many people together in celebration of coexistence.”

“P-22’s legacy will live on in his contributions to wildlife conservation and our heightened awareness of how to live in harmony with nature,” Sikich said.

Representatives of the Gabrielino Tongva and Chumash tribes compared the loss of native lands to the encroachment of humans on puma territory.

Most pumas in the Los Angeles area live in the Santa Monica Mountains, which are bisected by the 101 Freeway. That almost impenetrable barrier has cut off the cats from a wider gene pool to the north, leading to inbreeding and genetic abnormalities.

Scientific modeling has drawn a dire conclusion: Without interventions such as the wildlife bridge, pumas in the Santa Monica and Santa Ana mountains could be extinct within 50 years.

“The pumas of the Santa Monica Mountains are walking on a knife edge, and their path could lead to extinction or to coexistence,” said David Szymanski, superintendent of the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

The National Wildlife Foundation aims to raise $500 million for wildlife crossings in the next five years. The executive director of the Wallis Annenberg Foundation, which contributed millions to the Agoura Hills bridge, has pledged $10 million to the effort.

The Agoura Hills bridge, which broke ground on Earth Day last year, was largely funded by private donations from around the world, including from the foundation of actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

Three men pose with a cutout of a mountain lion From left, Joey Salehi, Jared North and Scotch Crisostomo pose with a cutout of P-22.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) P-22 fans arrived at Saturday’s celebration as early as 9:30 a.m. for the noon event, queuing on the sidewalks of Vermont Avenue to get the best spots in the 5,900-seat theater.

Inside, vendors sold shirts and pins, fans took photos with a cougar cutout, and a Los Feliz resident handed out free copies of a magazine she’d printed at home called “Catamount!”

Kathy Mellon, who wore a blue-and-white sweater showing P-22’s face, drove from Irvine for the event.

“It’s a short drive for P-22, when you think about how far he had to go,” Mellon said.

She has become known among friends and coworkers as a P-22 expert. Her friends, she said, have learned to expect a stuffed puma as a baby gift.

“I hope it brings a little closure,” said Rebecca Damsen of Ohio, who said she and her children had followed P-22’s exploits for years from halfway across the country. Damsen wore a faux fur stole and stuffed ears and a tail, originally from a “Lion King” costume.

A man poses with a photo of a mountain lion prowling past the Hollywood sign, and the same image is on his shirt National Geographic photographer Steve Winter holds his famous photo of P-22.(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times) The crowd also heard the origin story of P-22’s most iconic moment: a photograph that ran in National Geographic, showing the cat prowling past the Hollywood sign. It took six camera traps and 15 months to get the image, photographer Steve Winter said.

Wearing a shirt bearing the iconic image, Winter snapped photos of the crowd as he left the stage.

Elected officials — including Los Angeles City Councilmember Nithya Raman, state Assemblymember Laura Friedman (D-Glendale), state Sen. Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) and U.S. Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) — also honored their mountain lion constituent.

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