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CO wolf drop
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Sivart 04-May-23
Lost Arra 04-May-23
Sivart 04-May-23
Lost Arra 04-May-23
txhunter58 04-May-23
txhunter58 04-May-23
Orion 04-May-23
Glunt@work 04-May-23
Orion 04-May-23
Empty Freezer 05-May-23
Brotsky 05-May-23
Orion 05-May-23
Groundhunter 05-May-23
ultimag 06-May-23
Cheesehead Mike 06-May-23
goelk 07-May-23
ElkNut1 07-May-23
Medicinemann 07-May-23
bowhunt 08-May-23
DL 08-May-23
Live2Hunt 08-May-23
TRnCO 08-May-23
ElkNut1 08-May-23
Jaquomo 08-May-23
Treeline 08-May-23
Old School 08-May-23
ElkNut1 08-May-23
Pop-r 11-May-23
Paul@thefort 11-May-23
scentman 11-May-23
Brotsky 11-May-23
scentman 11-May-23
Aspen Ghost 11-May-23
Glunt@work 11-May-23
jdbbowhunter 11-May-23
Pop-r 11-May-23
JohnMC 11-May-23
Pop-r 11-May-23
KSflatlander 11-May-23
ElkNut1 11-May-23
Jaquomo 11-May-23
KSflatlander 11-May-23
Jaquomo 11-May-23
KSflatlander 11-May-23
Glunt@work 11-May-23
KSflatlander 11-May-23
From: Sivart
04-May-23
So did the reintroduction get delayed? I'm getting conflicting reports?

From: Lost Arra
04-May-23

Lost Arra's Link
Last I read they were having trouble finding someone or some state to provide the wolves. Wyoming said No

From: Sivart
04-May-23
They were trying to pass a bill, stating Ranchers need a management plan before they can be released.

From: Lost Arra
04-May-23
That may be true, but for now they have nothing to release.

From: txhunter58
04-May-23
Well, there is this:

30045d47-64b7-6202-15f4-186be6a2f619.png GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. – After more than two years of extensive statewide stakeholder meetings and outreach via a series of public hearings, the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission on Wednesday gave final approval to the final Colorado Wolf Restoration and Management Plan.

The plan was unanimously adopted through a two-step approval process that began at a CPW Commission meeting last month in Steamboat Springs.

The final approval clears the way for CPW biologists to introduce wolves in the Western Slope area and meet the voter-approved deadline of reintroduction by December 31, 2023.

“Within just 2-and-a-half years, and after robust stakeholder engagement, the Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved a responsible plan to implement the will of the voters and reintroduce gray wolves back to their historic range in Colorado," said Gov. Jared Polis. “This plan is better because of the thousands of Coloradans who provided thoughtful input, and I thank the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for their comprehensive work to develop this thoughtful plan. This science-based plan is the result of months of planning, convening stakeholder and expert working groups, and offering live and public comment opportunities, while factoring in the biological needs of the species, and creating the best possible chance for these amazing animals to be successfully restored to our state."

"I thank the Commission, the team at CPW, the many experts, Coloradans, and stakeholders who dedicated so many hours of their time, and especially the passionate public that has remained invested from start to finish, sharing their ideas and helping to shape this plan to prepare for enacting the will of Colorado's voters,” the Governor concluded.

After the Draft Wolf Restoration and Management Plan was released Dec. 9, CPW's extensive public outreach efforts through in-person and virtual meetings, as well as on its website engagecpw.org, produced about 4,000 comments online and via in-person testimony from 232 people at its five public meetings across Colorado in January and February.

“The Wolf Restoration and Management Plan is a huge accomplishment for Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the citizens of Colorado. In line with the will of Coloradans, we are on track to re-establish and restore wolves in Colorado by December 31, 2023,” said Dan Gibbs, Executive Director, Colorado Department of Natural Resources. “This would not have been possible without the tireless work of CPW staff and the Parks and Wildlife Commission, the members of both our advisory boards and the citizens and stakeholders who engaged and weighed in to make our wolf management plan the best for Coloradans and for wolves who will once again grace our Colorado landscapes.”

“We are so grateful to our advisory groups for providing their expertise to this plan and for those who came to public meetings and commented on the draft plan,” said CPW Director Jeff Davis. “As wolf reintroduction begins in Colorado, the input we received on this plan from a wide variety of stakeholders will help ensure a successful program in the years to come.”

At the April Commission meeting, many of the final edits for the plan were discussed, including:

Wolf-livestock depredation compensation The Commission supported revising the draft plan to raise the cap on livestock compensation, as well as guard and herding animal compensation, to $15,000 per animal. The Commission supported revising the draft plan to exclude veterinary expenses from the compensation cap for livestock, as well as guard and herding animals, up to $15,000 or the fair market value of the livestock at issue, whichever is lower. This means claimants can get paid for injury and death to livestock and related veterinary expenses, up to a potential maximum of $30,000 per animal. The Commission supported revising the draft plan to require claimants pursuing an itemized claim to provide documents or self-certify the use of vaccines and pregnancy checks in lieu of producing “Records for the current year that demonstrate vaccination status.” The Commission supported revising the draft plan to include a two-tiered compensation ratio (1.25:1 or 1:1) for missing yearlings depending on whether the claimant uses conflict minimization practices. This means if conflict minimization practices are implemented, a livestock owner that has had a confirmed cattle depredation by wolves may claim up to 1.25 missing yearlings for each confirmed cattle depredation (a 1.25:1 ratio). If conflict minimization techniques are not implemented, a livestock owner that has had a confirmed cattle depredation by wolves may claim up to 1 missing yearling for each confirmed cattle depredation (a 1:1 ratio). The Commission supported the draft plan, as written, insofar as it conditions 7:1 ratio claims on the claimant’s use of conflict minimization practices. This means that if conflict minimization practices are implemented, up to 7 missing calves and sheep may be claimed for each confirmed cattle or sheep depredation (a 7:1 ratio). Chapter 6 of the final Colorado Wolf Restoration and Management Planprovides more detail and examples specific to compensation and conflict minimization.

Wolf reintroduction and management The Commission supported Chapter 3 (Reintroduction Implementation) of the draft plan, as written, provided the Technical Working Group recommendations are incorporated by reference into the plan and that wolves injured in transport, if any, will be sent to a rehabilitation facility where feasible and appropriate in lieu of euthanasia. The Commission supported Chapter 4 (Recovery of Wolves in Colorado) of the draft plan, as written, concerning the population thresholds for the conclusion of Phases 1 and 2. The Commission supported Chapter 5 (Wolf Management), as written. The plan will not contain a geographical distribution component as a prerequisite to gray wolves moving from Phase 1 (endangered) to Phase 2 (threatened). See § 33-1-102(44), CRS (“Threatened species” means any species or subspecies of wildlife which, as determined by the commission, is not in immediate jeopardy of extinction but is vulnerable because it exists in such small numbers or is so extremely restricted throughout all or a significant portion of its range that it may become endangered.”) To transition from Phase 2 to Phase 3, the plan was amended to require a count of 150 wolves for two successive years or 200 wolves at any time and will add a geographical distribution component through a finding that the species “is present in a significant portion of its range." The plan was amended to require Division staff to conduct a population viability analysis as a prerequisite to gray wolves moving from Phase 2 (threatened) to Phase 3 (nongame). Following the conclusion of the initial release, CPW staff will provide updates on the plan at least annually to the Commission on the plan’s progress, but staff can be asked to provide an update, and the Commission may revise the plan and its regulations, at any time interval if there are significant new developments. A more formal review of progress on the plan will be scheduled for five years after the initial release. Visit CPW’s Stay Informed page and sign up for the Wolf Reintroduction eNews to stay up to date with CPW’s Wolf Restoration efforts

From: txhunter58
04-May-23
That news release was dated May 3.

I think all the language that would delay the release got cut from the current bill. What is moving forward is to be able to classify them as an “experimental population” that somehow helps down the road when we need to hunt them. The state was forced to remove all the language from the release document that called them game animals and allowed hunting in the future.

From: Orion
04-May-23
We will never be allowed to hunt wolves in Colorado. Your delusional if you think that will be a possibility. The wolfies have gotten that language taken out of every bill, plan, etc. that has been passed.

From: Glunt@work
04-May-23
And that's in today's Colorado. We are rapidly going left so I'm guessing wolves aren't the only thing we won't be hunting soon.

From: Orion
04-May-23
Glunt your right Lions and bobcats will be on the 2024 ballot

05-May-23
Welcome to California. All predators including the pedophiles are protected. The Libtards are winning everywhere. How do we stop them?????

From: Brotsky
05-May-23
Calirado....I feel bad for you guys, only a matter of time until they infect the rest of the western states unfortunately.

05-May-23
So where are the wolves coming from

From: Orion
05-May-23
To be determined. Last I heard they are looking at Washington and Oregon for wolves. Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming told them to go pound sand. CPW has also been caught in a few lies claiming they have been talking to some of these states.

From: Groundhunter
05-May-23
They can go to Wis and get all they want.

From: ultimag
06-May-23
Colorado will never have a wolf season wishful.thinking

06-May-23
Groundhunter beat me to it!

From: goelk
07-May-23
you Wisconsin I would like hear about your experiences living with wolves.

From: ElkNut1
07-May-23
One thing to consider is this! We had wolves dumped on us here in Idaho around 94. it was 18 years before we felt any wolf intrusion during our hunts. It will happen but not as quickly as many may feel. So, if it happens in CO the sky isn't falling that fast! -- Too, it just means you have to up your game, elk will still be there, don't fret it, you can still punch tags although as the years go by you will earn every bull! Good luck!

ElkNut

From: Medicinemann
07-May-23
Is there any specific language about the wolf "drops"? If not, drops from 5,000ft at 150 mph might be suggested.....sorry, couldn't resist. Or maybe wolf drops could be defined as a type of cough remedy.

From: bowhunt
08-May-23
^^^

Great plan

I would like to nominate some NE Oregon wolves to participate this drop program!

From: DL
08-May-23
Responsible Plan?????

From: Live2Hunt
08-May-23
Where they are in WI, the deer do not populate and herds diminish if that answers your question on how we are living with them.

From: TRnCO
08-May-23
Yeah Elknut1, it's not that the elk will be gone, the problem is that we already can't get a tag in many areas and with more hunters and fewer elk, that problem will only get worse. Not to mention moose and getting tags.

From: ElkNut1
08-May-23
TRcCO, It's no different here in Idaho. The wolves have affected us in many ways but still plenty of elk to hunt with the right mindset. CO boasts a huge population of elk when compared to Idaho. That will not change. No question wolves suck but most here will be too old to recognize much difference in the elkwoods.

In a nutshell I am the type of person to stay positive when faced with adverse conditions such as wolves being forced in situations as CO is facing. You guys will be OK! Stay positive!

ElkNut

From: Jaquomo
08-May-23
Elknut, how are your Shiras moose populations doing with the wolves? Moose numbers are down, tags are being cut, calf recruitment is way down.

From: Treeline
08-May-23
Was thinking that dropping them from a plane on Polis’s head would be a good way to fix a couple of major problems…

From: Old School
08-May-23
A big difference between wolves in Idaho and Colorado is that Idaho eventually allowed wolves to be hunted and their conservation Dept helped by shooting wolves/packs as well. Neither of those will ever happen in Colorado.

From: ElkNut1
08-May-23
Old School, those very words were spoken here in the beginning! Things change as results of their damage is recognized. Stay positive!

Jaq, good point, the Moose population has suffered dramatically here in Idaho. Nothing we can do about it, it's a done deal. If & when it effects CO population of moose, well what are you going to do,it is what it is as it happened here.

I don't get all shook up over it as if that were to make a difference, instead I roll with what were dealt with & maintain a respectable outlook. No way will I allow my blood pressure to sky rocket over a situation none of us can solve. Money talks here not our personal emotions. I wish you guys the best but plan on wolves & move forward. Complaining will not better ones situation! I am stoked I can still elk hunt OTC every year, I could care less about draws I just want to hunt elk.

ElkNut

From: Pop-r
11-May-23
As many hunters as CO has wolves will be shot like rabbits and there will be NO way to prove who did it. I assure you of this.

From: Paul@thefort
11-May-23
" Wolves will be shot like rabbits",. Oh really! So why would one shoot a wolf illegally? Pop-r, would you? Personally, I never would and I doubt the vast majority of hunters in Colorado, will not.

From: scentman
11-May-23
Jake, great minds think alike... my first thought was the "Turkey Drop" on WKRP in Cincinnati where they tossed out of an airplane turkeys that could not fly!

From: Brotsky
11-May-23
Couldn't agree more Paul. Everyone talks a good game until there is a wolf in front of them. The vast majority or sportsmen are not going to shoot an animal out of season, even a wolf.

From: scentman
11-May-23
Not a Wolf, but I've spotted a Fishercat on my property lately... knowing the damage they cause to small game I would never consider killing it... it's protected in NYS.

From: Aspen Ghost
11-May-23
Elknut, your philosophy is like those who tell a rape victim to relax and enjoy it. There still are many actions that could be taken to fight the wolf introduction.

I still don't understand why some org in Colorado hasn't sued yet to stop it based upon no environmental impact assessment done. The wolf introduction will introduce wolves onto national lands by dropping them on adjoining private lands. That is a simple legal argument that will win easily. That requires an EIA yet none has been done.

Pop-R, you'd have to be crazy to pop a wolf in Colorado unless it is chomping on you. No one needs the legal expenses and jail time that is sure to follow.

From: Glunt@work
11-May-23
The pro-wolfers would like nothing better than for some hunters or ranchers to martyr a few wolves.

From: jdbbowhunter
11-May-23
Fishers are not protected in NY, they can be trapped (during season), but you can't hunt them.

From: Pop-r
11-May-23
You boys have lost your minds. Poachers dont care about laws. They just need to think no one is around. Y'all act like most of the western slope of CO is like going down to the park downtown wherw there is an LEO around the corner.. I assure you wolves will be shot. Many of them.

From: JohnMC
11-May-23
I'm not suggesting anybody shoots a wolf in Colorado, I hope people take the high road. I think Paul is right when he says the majority of hunters won't either. With that said it wouldn't surprise me if 5 or 10% will if given the opportunity. If that is the case no doubt there will be some wolves ending up in the crosshairs. People poach all kinds of stuff, likely will be more appetite for some to do it with a wolf than other critters. I will be shocked if we aren't see headlines about a few dead wolves that were shot soon after they are released.

From: Pop-r
11-May-23
John we couldn't agree more for once.

From: KSflatlander
11-May-23
“I still don't understand why some org in Colorado hasn't sued yet to stop it based upon no environmental impact assessment done.“

NEPA (Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement) isn’t relevant because it’s a state issue and state plan. No federal nexus or action then no NEPA. The trapping and transport of listed wolves from other states would be covered under the NEPA process previously done for the ESA listing. I assume the will reintroduce them on state land.

From: ElkNut1
11-May-23
Aspen Ghost, terrible & rude comparison!

ElkNut

From: Jaquomo
11-May-23
Ryan, they are planning to dump them on a small parcel of private land in order to avoid any Fed interference. It appears a bill may pass the supermajority Dem Calirado legislature that would require 10J, among other management caveats, before dumping. But the governor's husband's wife said last week he will veto it if it gets to his desk.

From: KSflatlander
11-May-23
Lou- I thought the USFWS already declared the Colorado reintroduction population under ESA Section 10j (experimental population)?

From: Jaquomo
11-May-23
Not yet. Thats partly what the bill aims to do.

From: KSflatlander
11-May-23
The State of Colorado can’t make them 10J. Only the feds can do that. A state bill declaring them ESA 10J would be unconstitutional. State law can’t supersede federal law. Only the USFWS can declare them 10J.

From: Glunt@work
11-May-23
Bill requires that no intro until the Feds have 10J in place.

From: KSflatlander
11-May-23
That makes sense. Thanks Glunt.

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