Sitka Gear
Worn rototiller slip clutch?
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Medicinemann 11-Aug-23
Aspen Ghost 11-Aug-23
Bigdog 21 12-Aug-23
Pat Lefemine 12-Aug-23
Medicinemann 12-Aug-23
fuzzy 12-Aug-23
Ambush 12-Aug-23
Mad Trapper 12-Aug-23
fuzzy 12-Aug-23
Ksgobbler 12-Aug-23
From: Medicinemann
11-Aug-23
I love my 6' rototiller. In this day and age of no-till, I just really enjoy looking behind the tractor and seeing a smooth carpet of brown, freshly tilled topsoil. In the last day or two, I have had to pry a couple roots or small stumps from the tiller's teeth, and suddenly, this evening when I was almost done with one of my plots I noticed that the tiller teeth weren't turning as fast as the RPMs would suggest, but were only turning due to the forward motion of the tractor.....however, as soon as I started to lift the tiller with the hydraulics, then it started to turn at high RPMs again. I started to keep an eye on it after that observation and learned that when I only had a modest amount of down pressure on the tiller, it would rotate like normal.....but as soon as things got a little tougher (either from rolling terrain, or areas with a little more clay), the tiller teeth would slow to the speed of the tractor, NOT the PTO. I was wondering if the previous run-ins with roots, etc might have compromised the slip clutch in the tiller. Any thoughts from others that know a thing or two about tillers would be welcome.....

From: Aspen Ghost
11-Aug-23
Google "adjusting clutch on 3 pt rototiller". You may get by just readjusting it but worst case they can be replaced. The clutch is doing what it's there for, protecting everything else when you hit those roots and stumps.

From: Bigdog 21
12-Aug-23

From: Pat Lefemine
12-Aug-23
Easy fix. Happens frequently with rototillers.

What I do is basically just take a measurement of the bolts on the slip clutch and wrench it down another 1/4-1/2” and get back to the field. Slip clutches wear and slip. Tighten them up and you’re back in business.

If that doesn’t work then it’s a shear bolt and that’s also not a big deal either. Look up the bolt grade and replace it at TSC or Lowe’s.

Glad you’re not tilling your field with a garden hoe like you used to, you nut!

From: Medicinemann
12-Aug-23
Aspen Ghost, I have used You Tube videos to fix a bunch of things over the years. I have no idea why I didn't bother to check there before posting on Bowsite, Thanks for the reminder......and for the record, despite Pat's inference that I used to till my field by hand with a hoe, he is obviously joking.....or perhaps delusional.....which is also entirely possible. Jake

From: fuzzy
12-Aug-23
I replaced my clutches last winter. $60 parts 30 minutes labor.

From: Ambush
12-Aug-23
Lend it to a friend, then tell him he broke it. Go fishing while he fixes it.

From: Mad Trapper
12-Aug-23
I will be looking for the go fund me page…..

From: fuzzy
12-Aug-23
Jake one thing I'm seriously considering is buying a spare drive shaft for my King Kutter tiller. I use it a lot in New plots with rocks and roots so i burn clutches fast. the clutches are eager to replace with the shaft off. A shaft assembly is under $300 so if I buy a spare I can rebuild it in the shop and take one along on remote sites. I'm waiting for approval from SWMBO for the expenditures

From: Ksgobbler
12-Aug-23
Mine keeps breaking the chain. At first I thought the plates were seized. I took the off, cleaned them, torqued bolts to proper length. Using the tiller I made it till 10 ft from being done and chain broke again. I know it was slipping as I could smell it. Fixed the chain again and loosened the bolts a little more on the clutch. Next time out broke the chain again. Pretty frustrating. I went back to using my disc for now till I get the chain fixed again.

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