onX Maps
Instinctive Shooting
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
Hawken 12-Aug-23
fuzzy 12-Aug-23
TGbow 12-Aug-23
Ken Taylor 12-Aug-23
ahunter76 12-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 12-Aug-23
beemann 12-Aug-23
Hawken 12-Aug-23
beemann 12-Aug-23
elkmtngear 12-Aug-23
Juancho 12-Aug-23
Woods Walker 12-Aug-23
beemann 12-Aug-23
Recurve Man 12-Aug-23
fuzzy 12-Aug-23
Woods Walker 12-Aug-23
Supernaut 12-Aug-23
lamb 12-Aug-23
Jeff Durnell 12-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 12-Aug-23
shade mt 13-Aug-23
shooter 13-Aug-23
Justified 13-Aug-23
stealthycat 13-Aug-23
Missouribreaks 13-Aug-23
beemann 13-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 13-Aug-23
LBshooter 14-Aug-23
shade mt 14-Aug-23
Supernaut 14-Aug-23
Live2Hunt 14-Aug-23
beemann 14-Aug-23
Juancho 14-Aug-23
Jeff Durnell 14-Aug-23
Beendare 14-Aug-23
Live2Hunt 14-Aug-23
beemann 14-Aug-23
Groundhunter 14-Aug-23
WV Mountaineer 14-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 14-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 14-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 14-Aug-23
Missouribreaks 14-Aug-23
fdp 15-Aug-23
DanaC 15-Aug-23
Corax_latrans 16-Aug-23
Hawken 19-Aug-23
beemann 19-Aug-23
From: Hawken
12-Aug-23
New shooters coming into the world of archery oft times wonder about how to aim the arrow and with a little reading discover that some shooters (target & hunters) use a sight attached to the bow and with more reading our new shooter reads about using the 'gap system' for aiming. Last but not least our neo shooter reads about instinctive shooting! What is amazing to most individuals concerning this last method of shooting is just how in the world does someone hit a target with no apparent method of aiming? The key word in the previous sentence is 'apparent' as there is a method of aiming being used aka muscle memory and vision!! Starting in 1960 and for 50 years thereafter I competed in high power rifle competition whereby three different positions were utilized to shoot across the course aka standing, sitting, and prone. How is this related to instinctive shooting of the bow? Quite simple as a matter of fact because the human body has wonderful recall for muscle memory! After thousands of cartridges had been fired over many matches shot over the years I competed I had the ability to ascertain if I had the right position or not....just from muscle memory!! And now we're back to the big part of what we refer to as instinctive shooting of the bow and how.....MUSCLE MEMORY! After thousands of arrows being shot with the utmost attention being observed by a shooter to proper and consistent form an automatic system of 'feel' is developed such that a well practiced instinctive shooter can hit a target! The 'Hill' system of aiming is often brought up by Jerry Hill as to how his uncle Howard Hill shot the bow! Well I will tell anyone for certain that when Mr Howard was shooting dimes out of the air, quail and ducks on the wing, and a running lion running broadside to him at better than 150 yards striking the lion broadside behind the shoulder....Mr Howard wasn,t using gap shooting! Rather he was born with a unique gift of being able to just look at a spot and hit it and that gift was/is called instinctive shooting of the bow! This ability doesn't come overnight; rather after much practice one becomes better using this method! Nothing new here fellows as those of you that have been in the game for years are well aware of info here but just maybe a neo arrow slinger will appreciate the info! Good hunting and GOD BLESS!

From: fuzzy
12-Aug-23
G. Fred Asbell had some good ideas.

From: TGbow
12-Aug-23
Instinctive shooting is a style pf shooting some folks say don't exist. All my life I've shot what I call instinctive. Look at the spot I want to hit and shoot. Muscle memory plays a part but I don't care what they want to call it, I call it isntinctive..lol

From: Ken Taylor
12-Aug-23
I agree with all of the above... however, some people are naturally gifted with more aptitudes for doing that than others are.

From: ahunter76
12-Aug-23

ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
ahunter76's embedded Photo
Ken Taylor, you nailed it. I've seen it many a time in my 6 decades + of archery/bowhunting

12-Aug-23
“G. Fred Asbell had some good ideas.”

Them’s Fightin’ Words.

First thing: “what Howard Hill said” depends upon whom he was addressing and at what point in his lengthy career… He said a LOT of things, and without studying it all in exhaustive detail (which I have not done), it’s hard to know if he fundamentally changed his approach over time or if he simply described it differently over the years. And unfortunately, seems like most of those who have studied SOME of what Hill said in great detail are people who have not paid a lot of attention to the rest of what he had said or written elsewhere…

But one of the things he described is “split-vision”, which nowadays (at least on Leatherwall) is more often referred to as “Gapstinctive”, and is wildly popular with people who want to be able to hit anything beyond about 17.4 yards. Even some who are either unaware or prefer not to acknowledge that they’re doing it….. Like the guys shooting 3-under with a high anchor under their eyeball who insist that they aren’t “looking” down their arrow…

Fred Asbell told great stories and apparently made a good bow, but a cerified Archery Coach, he was not; I think he did bowhunting a real service by encouraging people to work on getting their hunting shots down to within 20 yards or less whenever possible, but he did a real DISSERVICE by convincing so many people that hitting an 8” or 9” “pie plate” at 20 yards (most of the time) is somehow the Gold Standard of barebow accuracy. A lot of his Disciples seem to find it Impure to even consider taking practice shots beyond 50 feet…

The problem (IMO) with the hype around “instinctive” is that it IS where you can End Up… after you have built a foundation of solid solid form and strong technique.

Pretending that you can learn to shoot that way is… misguided… at best.

I’ve noticed in many activities that it’s a bad idea to ask someone to teach you something if they don’t recall learning how to do it themselves. And if you don’t believe me, just ask a teenager how to do something new on your computer; they’ll whip through it so fast that you’ll have exactly zero idea what they’ve shown you unless you knew about 95% of it already. A good coach or a careful reading of a good reference book will get you squared away on that first 95%. The rest of it, you can enjoy pursuing for the rest of your life….

From: beemann
12-Aug-23
Oh my God GF here we go again. Everyone can throw a baseball. But not everyone can do it well enough to play in the major leagues. Using your old worn out logic would have us believe that because you cant do it you don't believe anyone can. G Fed helped many people Im sorry he couldn't help you. Lots of different ways of doing things thats cool by me. Why is it so hard for you, why cant you just say "well if it works for you good deal" Give your BS a rest... And yes I take some long shots for fun... If you had ever read all of Asbell,s stuff you would know he talked about shooting at a white milk jug in a plowed field at extreme distance and described it as great fun...

From: Hawken
12-Aug-23
Well...those that can't......try golf!

From: beemann
12-Aug-23
If you approach a task with the mentality that its not possible your correct its not possible..... carry on...

From: elkmtngear
12-Aug-23
"Muscle Memory" is certainly true, although, release and follow through are much less dynamic, than throwing a baseball into a catcher's mitt. If you've been shooting that way for years, your brain just "puts it all together", including compensating for steep uphill and downhill.

I have no doubt I could easily learn to shoot with sights (I was an expert marksman in the Military), but, I've been shooting a bow this way my whole life. I just know how to make the arrow hit the spot I'm focusing on (and, I can't see the tip of my arrow, because I shoot through a Whisker Biscuit). The brain-body connection, is an incredible and adaptive machine!

From: Juancho
12-Aug-23
I think I have the ability to look at the target and hit what I'm looking at.Developed over thousands upon thousands of arrows shot. Muscle memory , sure, concentration , of course. Looking at the arrow , no way. Any time , that , for whatever reason , I see/look at the arrow, I miss the target by a large amount. I have shot the flame of birthday candle off at night from 20 yds . Not with the first shot, with the third , but when we went to get the arrows, all three of them were touching. I was lucky I had over 20 witnesses when I did that. Just in case, I never attempted it again, and even less in front of anybody. It's nice when after decades , some of them still remember that shot, why ruin it? I also believe that , as in any sport, some are better than others , but all can benefit from a lot of good practice . Key word being "good". Doing something bad over and over will not make you any better.

From: Woods Walker
12-Aug-23
If I'm sitting at my desk and I roll up some paper and throw it at the trash can, I'll miss. If I pick a spot on the trash can...or even better a MOLECULE...then I'll get it in every time. Shooting a bow is no different, except it's arrows and not paper!

From: beemann
12-Aug-23
All good examples guys. Corax will be along shortly to tell you your wrong... Wait for it...

From: Recurve Man
12-Aug-23
Couple things I know and have learned shooting my recurve for 40 years. Shooting consistently in the yard and shooting at monster bucks are two totally different types of nerves and mind set.

I placed 5th in the world back in the 90s shooting IBO 3d targets in Shelbyville, IL. Since then have missed some monster bucks at less than 20 yards. My biggest hint of advice would be stay after it and develop a style or habit and practice all the time.

Shane

From: fuzzy
12-Aug-23
Lol...never changes. I've eaten a lot of bow killed game meat. More than the buzzards ever had from me.

From: Woods Walker
12-Aug-23
"My biggest hint of advice would be stay after it and develop a style or habit and practice all the time."

X2!! One of the things about this type of archery is that you have to shoot a lot, and if it's outside shooting Judos at weed heads, dirt clods, shadows etc. it's even better. You really have to LOVE it! Oh, darn it, now I think I'll have to go out back and shoot some more........ ;-)

From: Supernaut
12-Aug-23
Shoot everyday. Figure out what works and keep doing it.

If an "expert" or a "coach" (whatever that is) saw me shoot my recurve they'd probably have an aneurysm regarding my form.

I hit what I'm shooting at and I kill stuff. It might not be pretty or text book but it works for me and I have fun shooting.

From: lamb
12-Aug-23
thank you corax

From: Jeff Durnell
12-Aug-23
Hawken, you don't do instinctive aiming any favors by contradicting yourself, i.e. "He was born with it" and immediately after, "rather with much practice".

Intinct is a well suited term for the method, how it can be learned, improved, and maintained, but not because anyone is born with it. It's a well suited term because the most applicable definition is "Behavior that is mediated by reactions below the conscious level." 'Behavior' referencing both the learning process, and the actual aiming. Precisely how it works.

Corax, you're wrong. I know it for a fact because I myself am proof of it. I learned to shoot that way, first, right from the get-go in a straightforward manner, not in a roundabout way using ANY degree of conscious reference-type aiming hoping it would eventually morph into instinctive. No pretending. Did it. Intimate with it. Done. Didn't take long either. Taught others to do the same. YOU are misguiding others in the absence of facts. Just stop already. The 17 yard thing is b.s. too, and reveals your inability, bias, and/or unfamiliarity. But hey, who am I to convince you to stop letting that sunlight in. Keep it up.

12-Aug-23
With due respect, Jeff… The fact that you learned a skill in a certain manner doesn’t make that the best way to learn it. And the fact that you’ve had success teaching others the same way that you learned doesn’t make it the best way to teach it.

And that doesn’t slight you or any mentors you’ve had; you can’t fault anyone for not knowing what nobody knew at the time.

The great thing about Real Science is that the best information available is constantly being updated… with better information.

And the brain science around how we learn complex tasks has been extensively built out and re-written in the past 20-25 years, so why not tap into it?

Recommended Reading:

The Talent Code

Guitar Zero

Neither work is Archery-related, but about how we come to master complex tasks and how the neuromuscular circuits can be grown out more efficiently… or less, if you do it wrong…. We’ve already all agreed that it’s largely a matter of PRACTICE, so why not go about it as productively as possible…. ?

From: shade mt
13-Aug-23
i'm always amazed how one person can decide for another person how they do or do not shoot a bow..lol..crazy, is that like intersensory perception?

Now i really don't know how you all do it, but me? I been at this a long time, that's not boasting its just fact.....I am not the worlds greatest shot, but i am consistently a pretty good shot... so ....

at first i was a bonified gap shooter, yes i aimed with my arrow.........shot that way all through the 80's and 90's, and beyond, longbows, recurves....then a funny thing began to happen i realized i was shooting (and hitting) mind you what i was looking at without even looking at my arrow, especially under 25 yds....i would shoot a deer and think afterward...hmmm...don't think i even aimed.

well i would say after all those years, it just became ingrained in this noggin of mine....i kinda wanted to fight it because i thought, i HAD to aim!...but ya know there was that arrow right where i was looking, so i thought....well ya know hitting the mark is the name of the game right?...so why fight it?...let it happen.

now beyond 25 i do tend to resort back to gap, because frankly i do not shoot enough past 30 for it to be ingrained...and hunting i do like to keep it under 30..(15-20) is my preference

Now im gonna really stir the pot......Again you may differ, but once i began drifting to more instinctive, i really lost the need to hang out at full draw and anchor it does not benefit me except at longer ranges and that is because i am then resorting back to aiming....now for the pot stir.....I can shoot a much heavier poundage bow than most guys that have to aim..... often 70-75#

under 25 yds i am looking at the spot i want to hit, all while drawing, on occasion for some reason i may even hesitate before that last inch or two, and really fix my eyes on the spot, then complete the draw....middle finger hits the corner of my mouth and its gone, i never stop drawing, not a dead release, a pull through release...i also draw much slower than many simply because it best mimics a hunting scenerio.

Argue all ya want but i am probably shooting better than i ever did under 25 yds.....i imagine a target shooting coach might blow a gasket at my style....but it is kinda hard to argue when your hitting what you want to.

From: shooter
13-Aug-23
I think that truely instinctive shooting is a possibility for most. Like someone stated up above, "everyone can throw a baseball, not everyone will pitch in the major leagues". In order to be a good bare bow shooter, it takes a heck of a lot of practice, and practice every day, 365 days a year for the most part. I was big into traditional archery for 15 years, most of the stuff hanging on the walls around me right now was taken with stick bows, and for me, shooting traditional was a way of life. It was practice for at least 20 minutes, every day, and I didn't skip many days during the year. Most of the GOOD stick bow guys that I've met, here and else where, preach the same, practice, practice, practice. And yes, shooting at game is a lot different than shooting in your yard, that's why so many shoot carp and small game. Again, it's a way of life and no, it's not for everybody. I was blessed with 3 great kids, and for now, there is no more traditional archery as there isn't the time for it.

From: Justified
13-Aug-23
Hi personally believe one of the biggest problems with learning how to naturally shoot a bow is trying so many of them, and never settling into one particular bow for your mind and body to learn.

I’ve noted over the years with myself, and a lot of my fellow friends that a new bow could be picked up and bull’s-eyes immediately. Then, after four or five days that’s so good? Then sell the bow and look for something else and immediately bull’s-eyes, then after a week or so, not so good and it’s repeating over and over. Find a bow that fits hand good and that is quick and quiet and don’t put it down, shoot that bow over and over and over and over till it is like putting on the old leather belt. You won’t even have to look for the loops in pants! God bless.

From: stealthycat
13-Aug-23
I ask people ... do you point of aim shooting a basketball? throwing a baseball ? do you close one eye?

Instinctive shooting I think is focusing and shooting ... be a it a ball, an arrow, throwing something ..... focus, mechanics of what you're doing and do it the same every time

that's not to say using a point of aim or gap shooting don't work

13-Aug-23
Too many head games for most people.

From: beemann
13-Aug-23
"Pretending that you can learn to shoot that way is… misguided… at best." You know GF even by your usual idiotic standards this sets a new high mark for your stupidity.. Someone tells you this is how they did it and you come up with that. Asbell 's methods were simple and uncomplicated and they produced results for many people. How many thousands of people paid for his instruction and benefited from it. He was never coaching olympic archery. He said his method was for hunters. The fact that you couldn't benefit from his instruction does not mean his methods don't work. Maybe it means that you just suck as a pupil.. Your arrogant and condescending attitude does not show how smart you are. It proves what a fool you are.

13-Aug-23
@Shade - JMO, your process is the fastest, most reliable recipe for success. Gapping causes you to check to make sure your arrow is anchored in THE correct spot and pointed directly at your target on every shot. Which is the shortest path to building a strong, smooth, fast neuromuscular circuit which functions correctly every time… without conscious supervision. Which is what “instinctive” archery is all about, no?

Stealthycat’s on board, too — “ focus, mechanics of what you're doing and do it the same every time”. The process of throwing a ball does not put an obvious aiming apparatus right under your nose, but Archery DOES.

You can fight the feedback while your brain goes ahead and learns to use it with or without your permission, or you can use it to make those small-but-necessary corrections on every shot until they’re no longer required because your anchor has gotten so consistent that you’re already spot on when you hit that point in your draw cycle.

Most people wanting to learn to shoot instinctively would probably get there fastest with a peep and a single pin. And a clicker. Which is not The Traditional Way…. But Brain Science says it should produce better results, faster. Call me crazy, but I think the very idea of that really pisses some people off….

From: LBshooter
14-Aug-23
Personally I think most who try it get to wrapped up in their own head. It's like throwing a baseball, you don't aim, you look and throw, same with the arrow, look and shoot.

From: shade mt
14-Aug-23
The old "it's like throwing a baseball" does not mean you are going to just pick up a bow and hit what your aiming at.

How many of you could pick up a baseball and hit a pie plate every time at 15 or 20 yds? without a LOT of practice?....truthfully?...not many

There are those rare gifted individuals that can but most of us need practice.....If you are all over the place it's hard for your brain to ever become automatically focused....If you want to start out shooting instinctive without gapping or using your arrow, or you just are not consistent....The absolute BEST way to become consistent is start out close and shoot from there until your arrows are hitting where you are looking every time...then move back.

To many guys want to skip all the work, and they never really condition their brain. They shoot from 10, then move back to 20 without ever getting good at 10....and your brain never really fully adjust...and one day your good, next day your not, its 2 arrows good, and 2 flyers...etc..etc..etc..

in order to become consistently good, you have to hit what your trying to hit often enough for your brain to adjust to that.

if your always throwing high and outside...your brain doesn't automatically start putting them straight down the plate....you have to put it there often enough for your brain to start doing it instinctively.

From: Supernaut
14-Aug-23
"To many guys want to skip all the work, and they never really condition their brain."

I agree 100%.

I'll also add that it's not really "work" if you love doing it. I think a lot of guys are in love with the idea of traditional archery but not the dedication and practice it takes. A lot of people are looking for short cuts.

From: Live2Hunt
14-Aug-23
Instinctive is not learned like shooting a sight/gap. That is physical and can be taught and learned. Instinctive is gained through repetition of the same anchor and release. You can bounce between bows and be close, but does not take long generally for your brain to figure out the correct hold.

From: beemann
14-Aug-23
GF I won't speak for anyone else, but I"ll tell ya what pisses me off. It's not that there are different methods of shooting the bow. It's that you have been at this for years acting like some kind of expert. Throwing the term Brain Science around like it's some kind of shield. You have a critique for everyone that claims to do it differently. I ask you what are your credentials? What makes you such an expert that you can come on here and tell experienced guys that, "Pretending that you can learn to shoot that way is… misguided… at best". What pisses me off is the fact that you are an Obnoxious Blowhard...

From: Juancho
14-Aug-23
Now that I think of it, maybe part of the reason I can do it so well, has to do with two important things, or three. I've always been in great physical shape, first, second I've used the same 70# Black Widow for 25 years , before going to a heavier bow (81, 85 and 95# Black Widow bows as well ) , and third, I shoot at least 12 arrows every day. Been doing the same since 1993 when I switched from compound after shooting compounds with all the bells and whistles for 8 years. For some is easier than others, for sure, but when you finally master the art , the feeling is hard to put into words.

From: Jeff Durnell
14-Aug-23
Corax, your words make it obvious that you're biased and unfamiliar with instinctive aiming, or at the very least, learning it in an efficient straightforward manner. The main problem I have with that is it means you're giving some folks very bad advice. If one's primary goal is to learn instinctive aiming, learning by way of sights or other conscious reference first and expecting or hoping it will morph into instinctive is the lonnnngggg way to get there.

That said, not everyone can learn the same way, at the same rate, or even learn to do the same things. Instinctive aiming isn't for everyone, no aiming method is, and neither is any one learning method. But if it IS the goal, and one is capable, it can be learned directly in a relatively short amount of time.

Just out of curiousity, how long would one 'probably' have to shoot with a sight pin, peep, and clicker before they could become proficient with instinctive aiming?

From: Beendare
14-Aug-23
Howard Hill stated in his book he uses Split Vision……which references the gap at the tip of the arrow. This is different from the “ Throw a baseball” claims.

I’ve seen some good instinctive guys with stickbows…it can be done….but the Gap and Stringwalkers are more consistently accurate for sure.

I gave it a go for awhile….when I missed a 140 class buck at about 20 and 25y ( twice!) the instinctive guys advice of, “ You just have to shoot more” didn’t resonate with me.

I went to a gap and gapstinctive method ….and now I’m pretty darn accurate at my PO and in. It helps that I don’t shoot a heavy log of an arrow…that made my gaps too big- less accurate for sure.

.

From: Live2Hunt
14-Aug-23
The biggest things that get me shooting instinctive is form, not picking a spot and referencing the arrow/point. If I see the point of the arrow, I have to let down and redo.

From: beemann
14-Aug-23
Gentleman for the record I don't care what method anyone uses for shooting a bow. My greatest wish for all of you is that you find a method that works for you and allows you to enjoy the game of bowhunting. It is a wonderful pastime. Need a stress reliever go out and shoot some arrows. Need to be humbled when you think you have it figured out go shoot some arial targets. Want some great memories that will last you a lifetime, make the shot on a buck that you have hunted for years... The season for making memories is here , get out there... good luck to all of you this fall... Even you GF.....

From: Groundhunter
14-Aug-23
My God this has been beaten to death. Shot Trad for over 40 years, find a system and have fun.

You can throw a baseball, you can kill animals at reasonable distance.

Trick for me was year round shooting, but I loved watching an arrow fly.

14-Aug-23
Tom Clum.

Call your method poke and hope if you want. Just develop a solid shot sequence and you will hit your target. It’s not mystical. Or, even hard if your minds into it.

14-Aug-23
“Instinctive is not learned like shooting a sight/gap. That is physical and can be taught and learned. Instinctive is gained through repetition of the same anchor and release.”

You’re saying it’s two different things, and it’s really not. You can’t shoot sights/gap WITHOUT hitting the same anchor, because your anchor IS your rear sight, really — a peep arguably just “helps” you hit it every time, if you think about it. Because you can look through the peep-hole and still miss, but if you hit your anchor, you can’t help but be looking through it.

“Just out of curiousity, how long would one 'probably' have to shoot with a sight pin, peep, and clicker before they could become proficient with instinctive aiming?”

Long enough to come to full draw with eyes closed, then open the the eyes and find the sight pin centered in the peep. (The clicker doesn’t aim for you, obviously, but it’ll standardize the velocity and minimize vertical scatter, right?)

Starting out, the peep and pin tell you where your anchor is; with time and attentive, disciplined repetition, you can grow out a neuromuscular circuit that has you anchored in precisely the same spot every time, and the peep/pin are just along for the ride. And the more precise you are with every repetition, the faster, cleaner and stronger the circuit. I’ll bet most of the peep&pin guys here who are really good shots hardly ever have to hunt for their peep or adjust their bowhand to get that pin centered on their target. I’m sure it Just Happens. If they pop off their front sight, they’ll keep hitting; not itty-bitty groups, maybe, but say under 8” at 20 yards, I’d bet. They might need to work on trusting it for a bit, but if their left and right hands are accustomed to coordinating with each other, those arrows should go where they’re looking.

Analogy time: If someone handed you a chainsaw, pointed to a stack of logs and told you that they’d pay you $2 for every piece of firewood that was some unusual number of inches long, give or take 1/2”, but not a nickel for anything longer or shorter, would you just eyeball it and start cutting “instinctively”, or would you find a way to measure each piece to spec before you cut until you could eyeball it down to within half an inch every time? Because I’d bet you’d get there.

14-Aug-23
Wait a minute… when did Tom Clum get brought into this?

14-Aug-23
And thanks, Beeman — you, too.

14-Aug-23
Stay calm at the center. That is where some fail in many aspects of life, " Instinctive " shooting is but one. Leave the instinctive method to those who practice, and remain mentally calm.

From: fdp
15-Aug-23
Not really anything magical to it, and it is something anyone can do.

It's important to be able to tune your bow/arrow combination to shoot where you look though.

From: DanaC
15-Aug-23
Funny we don't call it 'instinctive pitching' or 'instinctive slap shot' or 'instinctive 3-point' or 'instinctive skeet' or...

What screws up shooting is *thinking* about it when your focus should be on *doing*. (And I've been making this mistake for 30+ years now. ;-) )

16-Aug-23
Sounds like my whole day today, Dana! Two other guys on the course and I was miserable. Cleaned it up considerably after they left….

From: Hawken
19-Aug-23
Hawken, you don't do instinctive aiming any favors by contradicting yourself, i.e. "He was born with it" and immediately after, "rather with much practice".

Didn't contradict myself at all IMO! FORM means everything in archery; no matter whether shooting in the Olympics or bare bow in the woods. Jerry Hill advised me once that Howard Hill shot his bow daily up until he got sick; oft times shooting up to 150 arrows daily. So....using the skill that he developed over many years of shooting, whether inherited from heaven or hard work, Mr Hill believed in practice and the retention of muscle tone through PRACTICE! Howard Hill was asked many times I would guess by many people "how do you do that?" Rather than coming back with a reply of "well I just look at what I want to hit and that's where the arrow goes" he came up with what he called 'split vision' or what's generally referred to as 'gap shooting'. Gap shooting I think works best for archers that wish to shoot out to 50 yards or better but I never used it for closer shots over the 60 years of hunting I did with the bow. Watching the performances that Howard Hill put on before the public it should be readily apparent to a sane observer that in the time frame in which Mr Hills' shots were made that there was no time for aiming; rather it was all done in what I refer to as instinctive. Six years ago I went through 44 sessions of radiation treatment for prostate cancer and in conjunction with that my Doc advised me to take three injections of estrogen because cancer loves testosterone! As a consequence of the combined treatments I was put into a weakened state because the estrogen robbed me of all of my muscle tone. I recently bought me a recurve bow of 62" length of 45# and have started to shoot again; it's been a battle but old muscles are becoming toned again and at 20 yards I'm pretty consistent in putting my arrows at a point I'm looking at. If there's a whitetail buck in Oklahoma that's stupid enough to come within 20 yards; he's in trouble I think! STAY SAFE GOD BLESS TO ALL!

From: beemann
19-Aug-23
Good luck Hawken, keep fighting and if you find that dumb OK buck post him up. Have a good season..

  • Sitka Gear