Solar question
General Topic
Contributors to this thread:
Hunts_with_stick 08-Dec-23
cnelk 08-Dec-23
cnelk 08-Dec-23
APauls 08-Dec-23
cnelk 08-Dec-23
Beendare 08-Dec-23
Hunts_with_stick 08-Dec-23
fdp 08-Dec-23
cnelk 08-Dec-23
Beendare 09-Dec-23
MA-PAdeerslayer 09-Dec-23
DanaC 09-Dec-23
Vaquero 45 09-Dec-23
Hunts_with_stick 10-Dec-23
Hunts_with_stick 10-Dec-23
cnelk 10-Dec-23
Beendare 10-Dec-23
cnelk 10-Dec-23
mulecreek 11-Dec-23
Hunts_with_stick 11-Dec-23
PAOH 11-Dec-23
WaleCanaty 04-Jun-24
Aspen Ghost 04-Jun-24
Will 04-Jun-24
Pop-r 07-Jun-24
Buckdeer 07-Jun-24
longsprings 09-Jun-24
Pop-r 09-Jun-24
W 11-Jun-24
Coyote 65 11-Jun-24
Buffalo1 11-Jun-24
Buffalo1 11-Jun-24
BlacktailBob 15-Jun-24
08-Dec-23
So, this goes along with the insulating a cabin thread. Is putting in a simple solar power system worth it? I have a small cabin, shed really 10x12. I am going to insulate it. Bought a tiny wood stove for it. Won’t use it that much, much and my son might stay there over night for one night during spring/fall. I might stay 2 nights during archery season. I have a battery operated lantern that works well. I’m just curious, is it worth it to try and put something else in to make it more comfortable? No running water or sewer. Someday we are hoping to build a house or cabin out there (5-10 years down the road). If it is worth it, where do I start? I have no idea about solar.

From: cnelk
08-Dec-23
Do it.

I put a Renogy 100w solar kit in my cabin. I have lights, usb charging ports, a 12v water pump. I also have a 400w inverter that I charge my battery operated tools, and plug in a radio [instead of using D size batteries for the radio]

From: cnelk
08-Dec-23

cnelk's embedded Photo
cnelk's embedded Photo

From: APauls
08-Dec-23
Worth it is so relative. They're nice to have but if you're living paycheque to paycheque it might not be worth it. If you take multiple $20,000 holidays in a year it might not be worth thinking about.

From: cnelk
08-Dec-23
My solar kit, lights, wiring and accessories cost less than $500

From: Beendare
08-Dec-23
Worth it if you set it up that way…but not cheap as you need a battery pack to take advantage of it. A 100ah lithium battery is $300+…and for a cabin you will want a minimum of 3 batteries…along with 6-8 panels- min to charge them plus a quality charge controller and possibly an inverter. $3k-$4k for the parts of a system like that

08-Dec-23
Cnelk, do you have the battery packs that beendare is talking about? $500 sure, couple thousand, maybe not….

From: fdp
08-Dec-23
For 3 nights a year (2 For you and 1 for your son) ? No way on earth. You can run lights in the cabin off a 12 volt car battery that you can charge with a simple inexpensive solar charger. We did that 40 years ago.

From: cnelk
08-Dec-23
I have one deep cycle marine battery. The Renogy kit that I mentioned comes with a controller, panel and everything needed to get a cabin setup for solar.

I’ll probably add another deep cycle marine battery when I add a tv antenna and monitor, maybe even a dvd player.

This year I spent many 5-6 day stays in my cabin and always have have plenty of battery life. That’s with having the radio on all the time and charging tool batteries and general camp life.

You do what you need to do. I’ll do what works for me.

From: Beendare
09-Dec-23
FWIW, the way to go about this is to build a spread sheet of electrical demand ( wattage) listing all lights, appliances, etc.

There are a bunch of those spreadsheets online that will tell you how big a system and the battery storage you need.

Stuff like a radio and led lights don’t take much…but when you start taking induction cooktop, electric heater, TV- those use a chunk of power its best to plan for.

Worth noting, its easy to undersize the wire in these systems creating a fire risk.

09-Dec-23
Love your cabin Brad….currently lookin for a piece of land we can build a cabin on off the beaten path now that we’ve moved. Have your thread pinned on my work computer where I do most of my thinking while I’m being paid hahah

From: DanaC
09-Dec-23
Gas. Can run lanterns, heater and stove. Our old camp was rigged this way, could go a weekend with a 20 lb tank.

From: Vaquero 45
09-Dec-23
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ After that if I hadn't bought my inverter or charge controller, and had two 12v deep cycle battery's I would go with a 24V system . Two 12v easy to rigg up into 24v . Also depending the weather were this cabin at I would choose the correct type batteries, AGM , etc .

10-Dec-23
2 nights at a time during hunting season, multiple times per season and then 1 overnight a bunch of weekends when the weather cooperates.

Going to check out the Renogy kit.

10-Dec-23
Another question. Has anyone thought about getting a gb1000 generator or gb2000 and then setting up a solar charging station to charge the generator? If I wanted to do that, how would that work? Not necessarily having a battery for the solar power, just direct charging during daylight hours?

From: cnelk
10-Dec-23
Check out Bluetti Solar Generators - YouTube is your friend

From: Beendare
10-Dec-23
Hunts with a stick,

Your comment, “2 nights at a time” doesn’t describe what amount of wattage you plan to use.

This is like a guy buying any old arrow off the shelf to hunt with… guessing isn’t a strategy especially when its so easy to calc out the system.

I think the one Youtube channel Explorist life has a spread sheet for this….but there are many solar sites that do, its that critical.

From: cnelk
10-Dec-23
If I was to do it again, I’d wire the cabin with 14ga romex, just like you would a house. That way if you ever did run 120v power to it, you’d be set. No calculation needed

10-Dec-23
id go with a portable ultra quiet generator. easier...more reliable...will operate everything you need in a small cabin...and many things away from your cabin.

you can get them for as much or less than you would pay for a decent solar unit.

heres one example. hard to beat for 350 bucks.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/PowerSmart-2500W-Portable-Inverter-Gas-Generator-for-Home-Use-Outdoors-Camping/924589416?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=101126138&&adid=22222222227924589416_101126138_148259120605_18593554745&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=660770505522&wl4=pla1877239967753&wl5=9017533&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=551114901&wl11=online&wl12=924589416_101126138&veh=sem&gad_source=1&gclid=CjwKCAiAg9urBhB_EiwAgw88meKOvB0vltPkEvP3G-UnJQmwh0WQxvS78EsMDcQI_Q9iBBOWI_7ZChoC6QYQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

From: mulecreek
11-Dec-23
The Goal Zero solar generator systems are very easy and straight-forward to get started. Various sizes to choose from depending on your needs. I use one to run my cabin and have no complaints after several years.

11-Dec-23
Thanks! Going to look into the goal zero solar generators

From: PAOH
11-Dec-23

From: WaleCanaty
04-Jun-24
They're lightweight, last forever, and pack a punch when it comes to power. I've been using one in my rig for a while now, and it's been a game-changer for my outdoor adventures. As for the question in the thread, I reckon if you're looking for a reliable power source for your bow setup, you can't go wrong with a lifepo4 lithium battery. They hold their charge like nobody's business, so you won't have to worry about running out of juice in the middle of your hunt. Plus, they're built tough, so they can handle whatever the great outdoors throws their way. But hey, that's just my two cents. Anyone else got experience with lifepo4 lithium batteries? Would love to hear your thoughts!

From: Aspen Ghost
04-Jun-24
"if you're looking for a reliable power source for your bow setup, you can't go wrong with a lithium battery."

AI posts are so ridiculous.

From: Will
04-Jun-24
Cnelk nailed it. Sweet set up.

From: Pop-r
07-Jun-24
I wouldn't wire a house with 14 ga. Maybe a few switch legs where I knew it was only going to be led lighting but as a rule 12 ga. is best and actually required in alot of areas. (Just clarifying)

Cnelk is only using a few small load items to which his system works great for. Step his system up Just a bit and you can run a deep freeze or virtually whatever you want. And he is absolutely correct on YouTube being your friend! I've learnt countless things from there and it's an amazing asset to have!

From: Buckdeer
07-Jun-24
I use solar in my building and I have 2 100W panels and 2 batteries made for solar.My issue is that my regulator fan runs and uses my power because it's in the building,any ideas?

From: longsprings
09-Jun-24
Be careful with insulation and a wood stove with a 10 x 12 ! Lots of btus with small area to heat , a small solar panel and solar powered heater with batteries will keep you toasty without the Wood stove eating up square feet and not being able to have stuff to close to stove ? Not a lot if space

From: Pop-r
09-Jun-24
A solar powered heater huh? Gonna keep you warm? Come on man... with a truckbed full of batteries?

From: W
11-Jun-24
I have a Jakery and solar panel for camping. It runs my CPAP machine and charges my phone. Something like that could work for you.

From: Coyote 65
11-Jun-24
Have a solar generator and 1000 watts of solar cells. Bought it to keep the pellet stove running for heat, and the freezers running to keep the deer/bear/elk from thawing. Also have a propane powered generator, but that has failed to start and been repaired a couple of times before. Town is an hours drive away, and sometimes it takes the snowplow 3 days to clear the road.

Terry

From: Buffalo1
11-Jun-24
I have a 8 x 16 storage building that I insulated and paneled. Built it into my camp house. No water, sewage or electric power.

During summer I use lanterns from Harbor Freight for light. Have got small rechargeable fan for cool and have a 2-burner camp stove hooked to a 5 gal. Butane bottle.

In the winter I use Coleman lanterns for light and heat and a My Buddy heater hooked to a 5 gal butane bottle.

It all works- functional, low cost and simple. No plans to spend any more money.

From: Buffalo1
11-Jun-24
I have a 8 x 16 storage building that I insulated and paneled. Built it into my camp house. No water, sewage or electric power.

During summer I use lanterns from Harbor Freight for light. Have got small rechargeable fan for cool and have a 2-burner camp stove hooked to a 5 gal. Butane bottle.

In the winter I use Coleman lanterns for light and heat and a My Buddy heater hooked to a 5 gal butane bottle.

It all works- functional, low cost and simple. No plans to spend any more money.

From: BlacktailBob
15-Jun-24

BlacktailBob's embedded Photo
BlacktailBob's embedded Photo
We have a solar system at this fly in cabin in Alaska. Single 12-volt battery used for water pump, small electrical items via inverter, and primarily to run bear fence when we're not around. Not particularly expensive and has worked well for us over past 25 years.

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