Mathews Inc.
Spraying Autumn Olive in winter
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
BUCKeye 11-Dec-23
goyt 11-Dec-23
CAS_HNTR 11-Dec-23
Zbone 11-Dec-23
BUCKeye 11-Dec-23
DanaC 11-Dec-23
fuzzy 11-Dec-23
fuzzy 11-Dec-23
BUCKeye 11-Dec-23
fuzzy 11-Dec-23
CAS_HNTR 11-Dec-23
Catscratch 11-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
Catscratch 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
Catscratch 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
DanaC 12-Dec-23
GFL 12-Dec-23
DanaC 12-Dec-23
Catscratch 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
Catscratch 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
dizzydctr 12-Dec-23
Vonfoust 12-Dec-23
Stressless 12-Dec-23
Stressless 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 13-Dec-23
dizzydctr 13-Dec-23
BUCKeye 14-Dec-23
Stressless 14-Dec-23
BUCKeye 14-Dec-23
From: BUCKeye
11-Dec-23
I'm planning to cut and immediately stump spray (gly) a bunch of Autumn Olive this winter. Everything I read says best time is when it's not frozen, but that's likely the only time I can get to it. Curious if anyone had success or issues killing Autumn Olive with this method in cold winter temps?

Will also be hitting some amur honeysuckle with this method, but it's less prevalent than the AO.

From: goyt
11-Dec-23
You could cut it and spray it with a basil herbicide with oil and I think that it would work. I doubt if gly would do any good.

From: CAS_HNTR
11-Dec-23
I try and spray earlier in the fall if I'm using gly.

Later season stuff I would lean towards Triclopyr and oil.

Not saying the gly wont work, but the Triclopyr will work for sure.

From: Zbone
11-Dec-23
What's Autumn Olive?

From: BUCKeye
11-Dec-23
I'm open to other herbicides, I just happen to have gly. I know from years of cutting AO is that I'm just going to stimulate sprouting by cutting if the herbicide doesn't work. I have some big patches that I regret cutting when I didn't also spray.

ZBone- highly invasive thicket forming shrub. Be glad if you don't have it.

From: DanaC
11-Dec-23
Pull it out with a chain. The roots are shallow. Then spray suckers next year. (We cleared tons this way.)

From: fuzzy
11-Dec-23
DanaC I did a small patch (acre more or less) this spring with backhoe and tractor/loader, sprayed in July with glyphosate then brush hogged the new growth in September and then went over with a 5 foot tractor rototiller in October and it seems to be cleaned up.

From: fuzzy
11-Dec-23
For the original poster, glyphosate in winter will be ineffective.

From: BUCKeye
11-Dec-23
Fuzzy, do you think winter sprayed Triclopyr will work?

I won't be able to get a tractor to most of it.

Appreciate all the feedback

From: fuzzy
11-Dec-23
Most herbicides are effective when plants are actively growing. Triclopyr breaks down the the soil in a few days. Your best bet is to cut now, spray in spring

From: CAS_HNTR
11-Dec-23

CAS_HNTR's Link
Good read here about plant and killing it!

I'll stand by the triclopr.

From: Catscratch
11-Dec-23
Mix the tri with diesel and let her rip. Make sure you spray the cambium layer.

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
Catscratch does that really work when dormant? I need to give it a try. I have more time mid winter for such.

From: Catscratch
12-Dec-23
It works for me on Honey Locust and Osage Orange (can't speak specifically to AO). Both usually come back from a foliar spraying, and Locust tends to Medusa out with a flurry of root sprouts if sprayed. They are a pain in the ass! Dormant basal spraying on small ones and dormant stump cutting on larger trees are my most effective methods. Plus you don't have to fight chiggers and ticks in the winter!

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
Catscratch , autumn olive is a whole other level. Only good thing compared to locust and hedge is no thorns.

From: Catscratch
12-Dec-23
Lol, I always say Locust is an whole other level! Would hate to think of something worse. I've killed AO before, but since it barely survives here it doesn't take much to kill it. Locust seems to eat gly and tri foliar sprayings for lunch. May kill a stem but it'll come back with 50 more. Those invasives are such a pain!

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
Yes sir they are. We don't have much honey locust the yellow locust responds well to 2,4D products

From: DanaC
12-Dec-23

From: GFL
12-Dec-23
I think Remedy would work better than gly.

From: DanaC
12-Dec-23
One of those gizmos on a skid-steer is the bomb for yanking out russian/autumn olives. As I mentioned earlier, they have shallow roots and come up EZ.

From: Catscratch
12-Dec-23
Remedy's active ingredient is tri.

Tree puller and clippers are worthless on locust. Will AO not come back from root? Any root left in the dirt comes back with a vengeance. Good way to make an impenetrable thicket though. Glad we don't have olives!

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
Catscratch they come back from larger root stock. They don't stand being "hammered" by repeated tillage or clipping. The more you hammer locust the more locust you have. Either have to spray it or graze it out. Different strategies.

From: Catscratch
12-Dec-23
Thanks fuzzy, curious about them more than anything. I've read about AO on habitat forums but don't really have to deal with it. The state planted a bunch on public lands a couple of decades ago, they didn't really spread.

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
They are awful here. You CAN spray em out if you get the thickets cut back but it takes repeated applications. I've had better luck grubbing and mowing and tilling. Let em have a couple years break and they come right back from seeds spread by wildlife.

From: dizzydctr
12-Dec-23
I agree with Catscratch. Remedy/Triclopyr in diesel fuel works for me. I use the basal spray method in late winter before the sap gets flowing(after deer season and prior to turkey season). I don't cut anything unless it is over 4-5 inches in diameter at the base, just spray it on the bottom 12-18 inches of the shrub. For larger trees I use the hack and squirt method with Triclopry and Arsenal/Polaris. Works well for me on most undesirables such as autumn olive, privet, osage, box elder, Chinese tallow trees, etc.. I don't recall how effective it is against honey locust but would suspect it would work well on the smaller saplings.

From: Vonfoust
12-Dec-23
"I don't cut anything unless it is over 4-5 inches in diameter at the base, just spray it on the bottom 12-18 inches of the shrub." So I can just spray Tri/diesel fuel mix on the base of this Godforsaken AO late winter and it kills them? That almost sounds too good to be true for what I'm dealing with.

From: Stressless
12-Dec-23

From: Stressless
12-Dec-23
Jezzz... it's really not that hard to find Science - Not opinion - always good to ask but I recommend the science.

I generally only terminate AO and grapevine in the winter. I mix diesel with triclopyr in a 2 gallon pump sprayer with Dye so if you're doing a area you know which ones you've done. Apply as a Basal Spray to the top of the fresh cut stump and 4"-6" of the stump below the cut. Dead dead - no growth, no shoots. Note the warning on using Tordon in any spray the effects to non target woody stems is severe.

As a "Buckeye" the OSU site has loads of pertinent info on how to control invasive species, Autumn Olive/Russian Olive specific is below.

Cut/Paste: https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/F-69-11

Foliar Spraying Herbicide

Foliar spraying is a method of control in which a dilute concentration of herbicide is sprayed directly on the leaves. Herbicides need to be applied sometime after the plant is in full leaf and before the onset of fall color in order to maximize effectiveness. Herbicides are generally applied to wet the leaves but not to the point of runoff.

Basal Spraying Herbicide

A basal application for autumn and Russian olive refers to the spraying of a labeled herbicide mixed with an oil-based carrier on the lower 12–18 inches of the main stems. The herbicide is sprayed, ensuring that the main stems are wet but not to the point of runoff. Basal bark treatments should only be applied when the areas to be treated are dry and not frozen. The basal bark treatments recommended in Table 2 should be applied during the dormant season. Due to the spreading growth habit of autumn and Russian olive, access to the lower stem portions of the shrub is not always easy to achieve. Care should be taken to ensure that the chemical being applied is reaching the lower stem portions of the shrubs and not merely being applied in its general vicinity.

Good Luck.

From: fuzzy
13-Dec-23
Jeez stress less , thanks!

From: dizzydctr
13-Dec-23
Through the years I have killed Autumn Olive and entire thickets of Chinese Privet using the basal spray method mentioned above with 20-25% Triclopyr in diesel fuel with a blue indicator dye. I use a 4 gallon backpack sprayer and spray in late winter before spring. It works well for me. I generally mix it up 5 gallons at a time with 1 gallon of Triclopyr and 4 gallons of diesel fuel with indicator dye in a used 5 gallon oil or hydraulic fluid bucket.

From: BUCKeye
14-Dec-23

BUCKeye's embedded Photo
BUCKeye's embedded Photo
I got 1/2 gal of this at the local farm store for about $80. It says acid equivalent triclopyr 44.3%. I got some blue dye so that it's not wasted beyond the cut stumps/basal spray.

If I'm reading the label correctly, I mix this with enough oil (I will substitute diesel) to make 2 gallons.

From: Stressless
14-Dec-23
Yup that looks right 64oz at 61.6% AI in your Brushtox

Garlon 4 Ultra is the same active ingredient at 60% close enough.

From the OSU AO/RO datasheet:

Screenshot-2023-12-14-183406

20% solution with diesel would be adding this at 1:5 or 64:320 (oz) or one half gallon (64oz) jug you got to 2.5 gallons of diesel. Your mix will be a little hot if you only add 2 gal of diesel but you're trying to KILL what it lands on so happy spraying and pls wear your PPE! Mask, W/P Gloves rubber boots etc.

From: BUCKeye
14-Dec-23
Thanks

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