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Luckiest shot you ever saw
Elk
Contributors to this thread:
Groundhunter 12-Dec-23
Scoot 12-Dec-23
Zbone 12-Dec-23
huntnmuleys 12-Dec-23
KsRancher 12-Dec-23
Bowboy 12-Dec-23
Beendare 12-Dec-23
Ziek 12-Dec-23
Bake 12-Dec-23
midwest 12-Dec-23
JohnMC 12-Dec-23
smarba 12-Dec-23
Bou'bound 12-Dec-23
x-man 12-Dec-23
Treeline 12-Dec-23
Grey Ghost 12-Dec-23
Corax_latrans 12-Dec-23
Bowaddict 12-Dec-23
JTreeman 12-Dec-23
buckeye 12-Dec-23
drycreek 12-Dec-23
Chattahoochee 12-Dec-23
Chattahoochee 12-Dec-23
timberline53 12-Dec-23
timberline53 12-Dec-23
Grey Ghost 12-Dec-23
Zbone 12-Dec-23
Beav 12-Dec-23
Ziek 12-Dec-23
redquebec 12-Dec-23
Brian M. 12-Dec-23
Tony 12-Dec-23
Beendare 12-Dec-23
Pole Mtn 12-Dec-23
Zbone 12-Dec-23
JohnMC 12-Dec-23
Brotsky 12-Dec-23
fuzzy 12-Dec-23
ahunter76 12-Dec-23
Basil 12-Dec-23
Knifeman 12-Dec-23
WhattheFOC 12-Dec-23
Treeline 12-Dec-23
TonyBear 12-Dec-23
Hunts_with_stick 12-Dec-23
Beendare 13-Dec-23
Zbone 13-Dec-23
sitO 13-Dec-23
Rock 13-Dec-23
redquebec 13-Dec-23
KB 13-Dec-23
Wilburness 14-Dec-23
BoggsBowhunts 14-Dec-23
Zbone 14-Dec-23
Pat Lefemine 14-Dec-23
RK 14-Dec-23
tobywon 14-Dec-23
redquebec 14-Dec-23
Live2Hunt 14-Dec-23
Scar Finga 14-Dec-23
BUCKeye 14-Dec-23
badbull 15-Dec-23
mick 15-Dec-23
12yards 15-Dec-23
Beendare 16-Dec-23
gil_wy 16-Dec-23
ahawkeye 16-Dec-23
fuzzy 16-Dec-23
Candor 16-Dec-23
Zbone 16-Dec-23
Candor 16-Dec-23
mick 16-Dec-23
redquebec 16-Dec-23
Beendare 18-Dec-23
Stoneman 18-Dec-23
LeeBuzz 18-Dec-23
JB 20-Dec-23
KHunter 21-Dec-23
bowhunt 21-Dec-23
stealthycat 22-Dec-23
So467 25-Dec-23
bowhunter24 25-Dec-23
fuzzy 26-Dec-23
nchunter 26-Dec-23
MichaelArnette 27-Dec-23
bluedog 27-Dec-23
Bowfreak 27-Dec-23
From: Groundhunter
12-Dec-23
Just watched Hunt Master on TV. Greg Ritz hit a big bull, way high in the neck, with a mechanical, and it dropped dead on the spot. Not much penetration. but dead is dead. The guide said he never saw anything like that in his life. I will take some of that luck.

From: Scoot
12-Dec-23
I didn't see it, but I know a guy who shot a really big whitetail-- it was bedded in the snow and about 45 yards when he shot. His shot fell way short, several yards, but the super crusty snow skipped his arrow up and he got a double lung pass through. The buck ran 50 yards and dropped stone dead.

From: Zbone
12-Dec-23

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Peak rut, buck was cruising, couldn't get him to stop at the shot and then fell like a ton of bricks, didn't even kick...

From: huntnmuleys
12-Dec-23
A guy I know here shot a cow elk this year. Hit her in the back leg slightly above the knee. She bled out and died within 100 yards

From: KsRancher
12-Dec-23
Huntnmuleys. We all know that guy.

From: Bowboy
12-Dec-23
Yep Greg was lucky on that bull.

From: Beendare
12-Dec-23
Luckiest was admittedly mine.

I watched a buddy stalk and shoot a mulie buck. I was watching the whole thing through my big binos. He shot it too far back and my buddy knew it immediately. . The buck took off downhill straightaway, then made a hard right, went 300y and bedded in a strip of aspens.

I met my buddy, told him exactly where he was. I circled above him and he was supposed to sneak in on him from below. He basically walked right in on the buck and jumped him before I was setup. The buck took off on a fast trot across the hillside downhill from me and going away. I drew and guessestimated about 80y, swung my bow 15 feet in front of him and launched an arrow that shockingly hit him in the hind quarter almost knocking him over. Miracle.

We still had to track him another 1/2 mile...but the blood from that arrow left a good trail to follow and finish him off.

From: Ziek
12-Dec-23
Back when I had a Colorado sheep tag, 1994 I think, I was after a particular ram, but wound up shooting another one. I heard that a bit later in the season another bowhunter shot under the first ram I was after (it had an ear tag). But doing his due diligence, he checked anyway. He found blood and I think the back half of his arrow. So he tracked it. I think they found it the next day with the arrow pushed up into its chest from directly below. They deduced that the arrow had missed low and ricochet up into its chest with little penetration. When the ram finally bedded, it forced the arrow up farther and killed him.

From: Bake
12-Dec-23

Bake's embedded Photo
Bake's embedded Photo
I don't know if I should tell this story in writing. I shot my first zebra right under the ear. It was my first safari in 2016 and I was fully in the throes of target panic but didn't know it (I missed a HUGE elk the year before due to TP). I shot horrible that trip. I was flinching at the shot and pulling shots WAY off. Just awful. Make you question your very existence awful.

We put a stalk on some zebra stallions, and ultimately the group spooked. When the group spooked there was a stallion down in a dry creek bed that couldn't see us. So when the rest of the group spooked I drew and got ready for that stallion to come up out of the creek bed. Which he did. He stopped broadside at 35 yards and I was at full draw and ready.

I flinched, pulled it, muffed it, F'd it all up. hit him about 2 inches under the ear. Cut an artery. He ran up the mountain, stood still a minute, then walked down the mountain, to within 10 yards of a farm road and laid down and died.

From: midwest
12-Dec-23
These are good….wow.

From: JohnMC
12-Dec-23
We had a trad guy that always showed up to our Wednesday night 3D leagues. Probably about 70 years old. Like to brag about the heavy weight bow he shot want to say in the 70lb range. He was truly one of the worse shots I have ever seen, but a nice guy. He carried a big Bowie knife and chunk of wood in his pocket. I asked for what it was for and he said to dig arrows out of trees.

Anyway he was shooting a couple groups behind my group. I heard a squealing rabbit and figure some one brought a predator call. A buddy was shooting in his group and said he was shooting at a 3D target and missed it by a few yards to the side and hit a rabbit in the brush they had no idea was there.

From: smarba
12-Dec-23
Back in the day before rangefinders I had 2 pins on my finger compound: "close" and "far". A snowshoe hare hopped onto a logging road and stopped "far". I drew, aimed and let fly with a blunt. Arrow hit 10-feet short, ricocheted and killed him. Best of all my buddy was right beside me as a witness. He whooped "man, what a trick shot, you'll never do that again!" Still haven't, thankfully.

One other time I was hunting ptarmigan in the snow with my dad. Similar thing, distance was "far". Let a blunt fly and CRACK! bird didn't even flop. Snowshoed over to get it. It had head turned 90D to me and arrow passed thru head took out both eyes, just a clean hole thru its head. I took it back to my dad and told him I was aiming to save meat LOL.

From: Bou'bound
12-Dec-23
Was target shooting as a kid and the arrow went over the milk jug I was shooting at and into the woods

I went looking for the arrow. It was stuck in a rabbit

can’t get much luckier than killing an animal you didn’t even see when you shot.

From: x-man
12-Dec-23
Pretty much every shot over 60 at a live standing animal that actually hit and killed the animal. Also, every shot at an animal staring you down when you release the arrow.

Lucky that the animal was still there when the arrow got there I mean.

From: Treeline
12-Dec-23
Back in high school had a buddy get a ricochet shot on a buck that I witnessed. His arrow hit way short and bounced up and hit that buck right in the heart. Buck jumped, kicked and made it about 30 yards. The broadhead only went in a few inches and was mangled from hitting the rocks first.

From: Grey Ghost
12-Dec-23
My luckiest shot was on a bull elk early in my bow hunting career. I was setup in a natural ground blind beside a watering hole. I had only been there about 5 minutes when a nice 5x5 came out of the timber on a steady trot towards the water. He jumped into the muddy, stinky water and began spinning in circles like an excited child. It seemed like I held my full draw for 10 minutes, while I waited for him to stop frolicking. Finally, he stopped broadside for a split second and I let the arrow fly just as he began spinning again. The arrow angled thru his package and into his right femoral artery. He went about 30 yards, laid down, and bled out in about a minute.

Matt

12-Dec-23

Corax_latrans's embedded Photo
Second attempt ever at this target at this range. Between 80 and 90. The shot angle was actually very much broadside, but this shows arrow’s attitude as it dropped in…
Corax_latrans's embedded Photo
Second attempt ever at this target at this range. Between 80 and 90. The shot angle was actually very much broadside, but this shows arrow’s attitude as it dropped in…
I had this one bird doing some damage to my garden. It’d perch on the edge of a box I had built to make a raised bed, and I had made several attempts at picking it off, but each time it reacted to the in-bound arrow and flew about six feet to perch on a low-hanging branch of a Russian Olive. It was about a 25-yard shot, so at about 165 fps and with a flu-flu, it had plenty of time to get out of the way…

Third try, it flushed as I was releasing (or just about to) and I led it exactly right. All but took its head off with a Judo and a standard fletching job. There was just a beak still attached to the neck.

My other luckiest shot was the doe that was literally stalking in on my brother and picked up a hind hoof as I was releasing, which captured my full attention. So that’s where the arrow went. I think I missed her hoof with the broadhead and brushed it with the fletching. Just lucky as hell that I missed clean.

And a buddy of mine was on a 3D course, shooting downhill at a standing bear target from an angle such that a poor shot was at risk of clipping the trunk of a big tree just to the left. There was a squirrel on the ground just off to the right, and as he was releasing, the squirrel jumped up onto the side of the tree and up into the path of the arrow. Hard to say how much was the Archer nailing the mark which captured his attention on the release, and how much was the squirrel intercepting the missile.

From: Bowaddict
12-Dec-23
My brother on his first elk trip, had a small bull at 25 yds. In all the excitement he didn’t notice a small branch in way. He saw the arrow deflection, but didn’t see impact. He swore it was still a good hit, and the non-stop blood trail made it appear that way. After 200 yds of great blood but no elk, I talked him into backing out and picking it up the next morning. After 200-300 more yards we found the dead bull, smacked square in the face! The bull bled out from an arrow to the nose.

From: JTreeman
12-Dec-23
Pretty much anytime I kill an animal I call it lucky!

Most recent luckiest one was a Rusa deer in Australia. I had shot at a nice stag a couple days before and bounced it off a stick (which I was pretty sure was gonna happen, but only shot I had). Similar situation 2 days later but more open. Crawled in on them bedded and proceeded to wait them out. Wind got a bit fickle and they got nervous so I drew and came up onto my knees. They kinda sorta busted out (a “soft bust” if you will) and a good stag stopped near a tree to look around as he didn’t know what was happening. I guessed 45 and let it fly. I didn’t really see the arrow fly (I often don’t) but heard it crack on a limb, but also saw lots of blood right behind his elbow. Like a heart shot, but not much penetration. PH comes up and says “hit another stick eh mate?”. We waited about 45 min and found him about 50 yards from where I shot him. Lucky.

Had some crazy luck this year on a moose and a mule deer too, but not necessarily shooting luck, just regular luck.

—Jim

From: buckeye
12-Dec-23
My first deer, a yearling doe I Texas heart shot, arrow was half way out her chest . I had a deer in my sights and let er fly... stupid. Another time more recently, a single strand of fence I couldn't see deflected my arrow down and just clipped the belly of the ten pointer I was shooting at. The wound was evidently big enough for him to gut himself as he ran. Crazy lucky we found that deer and not how I wanted it to go. There have been several other not so great hits, neck and liver that proved very fatal but shit happens. One more I can think of is watching the shlock master kill a bull elk at 120 yards with a recurve. If the bull hadn't taken 4 or 5 steps after the arrow was released, he would have missed by quite a bit. I like the dude, but for goodness sake don't put that on tv.

From: drycreek
12-Dec-23
Oh my !

12-Dec-23

12-Dec-23
Head shot antelope doe at 470yrds in high wind....was aimed at the shoulder....gun , not bow.

From: timberline53
12-Dec-23
This fall while hunting pronghorns in Nevada, I was working quietly up a sage covered hillside and was just peaking over the crest when I spotted several does and a nice buck feeding unaware 65 yards away per my rangefinder. Carefully knocking an arrow while keeping an eye on the bucks location, I drew and released what looked to be a perfect arrow as the buck bolted with blood already pouring from his side. Yes, thank you Lord! This buck will be mine shortly, I smiled with confidence. My elation turned to uneasiness as I watched the buck run down a huge ravine and then back up the other side continuing to run hard uphill as if he was untouched. I could see the arrow sticking out both sides of his ribs just a bit too high, and blood now covered his entire golden tan coat. How can he keep going I marveled as I watched him climb a mile away up a steep mountain side and finally laid down in the wide open. Examining him through the binos, I could see in unbelief that his head was up and eyes fixed on the unseen predator below. I waited for an hour and he was still there, so when he got up to reposition himself, I quickly skirted the ridge and began a stalk around the mountain to come down from above him. Five hours later, with the sun bearing down mercilessly from a cloudless sky, I was finally getting in range for another shot to end the antelope's torment and mine, when the steady uphill breeze swirled at the most inopportune time, and the buck was gone! I just about cried, as I watched him charge down into another gulley and climb yet another mountain heading directly for the Duck Valley reservation where I could pursue him no longer. Sprinting down the gulley and back up the opposite hillside I tried to cut him off before he crossed the fence into Native American Lands. He was sidehilling just ten yards away from the fence when he stopped briefly on a rocky outcrop to look back for his pursuer. I knocked another arrow hesitantly, and prayed, "Oh Lord please direct this shot that's way beyond my skill and ability so the buck won't suffer any longer, and his meat won't go to waste. Not having time to range, I put my 125 yard "ibex" mark painted on the bottom of my site on his shoulder and released. To my dismay, the buck ran off over the rocky bluff and disappeared. With great disappointment I worked down to where the buck last stood, and literally jumped in utter astonishment, as there was my arrow broken in half, covered with blood! Frantically, following a fresh stream of blood, I found the buck lying dead, pierced through the neck, right on the Reservation fenceline! I fell to my knees, my eyes tearing in unashamed relief, and thanked the Lord for directing that merciful arrow, allowing me to recover my "miracle" Nevada pronghorn.

From: timberline53
12-Dec-23

timberline53's embedded Photo
timberline53's embedded Photo
Sorry wrong photo--hope this one comes out right side up!

From: Grey Ghost
12-Dec-23
Good story, timberline53, but I think you posted the wrong pic.

Matt

From: Zbone
12-Dec-23

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Speaking of head shots reminded me of this limb ricochet Snuffer...

From: Beav
12-Dec-23
One time wild hunting cottontails with Marty, we were hunting a draw that was choked full of plum thickets. Marty was going to sneak up through the draw as I had snuck around to block in case some rabbits ran out ahead. I had switched to a field tip as it was so thick. A coyote came running out and I swung way out and front and held my 70 yard pin way high and let er rip. I spined the beautiful coyote on the run!! Marty showed up 10 minutes later and couldn't believe it.

From: Ziek
12-Dec-23
Not really a lucky shot but...

My wife and I were shooting on our marked range one day from 50 yards. Just as she reached full draw, I noticed a humingbird flitting around my bright colored fetching at the target. I thought about telling her, but then thought, "what are the chances", so kept it to myself and let her shoot. Well, I heard a slight tick sound just as her arrow arrived and the hummer just disappeared. She was pretty upset when we found it dead, on the ground.

I still like to brag about how she is such a good shot that she can hit a hummingbird in flight out to 50 yards.

From: redquebec
12-Dec-23
I hunt on the ground, longbow wood arrows, need close high percentage shots to succeed ethically. I saw a unique buck several times in the season (5 years ago) and decided I wanted him. Lo and behold in a light rain, guess who comes down the trail. He was moving with a flat back trot if you know what I mean, not too fast but not just walking. He had his neck extended out in front of him following a doe's scent so that his entire spine, neck and back were in a straight line. I decided in the moment that I could make the shot (17 yards) so I followed through with his motion and released. He stopped on release and I hit him...

Now let me add this I am a chiropractor and I know spinal anatomy well, I knew right away what happened when I hit him. If you look at the anatomy of the neckt here's a junction where the base of the skull meets the top vertebra of the neck, the atlas. The neurology that passes through that junction is the brainstem (medulla oblongata) which contains the neurological innervation for the heart and lungs. Sever that and the heart and lungs cease to have any nerve signals.

I watched my two blade single bevel basically decapitate him and he fell utterly motionless and dead as a door nail in half a second. I felt terrible about my decision to shoot and promised myself to never take a shot like that again. The worst thing that an outdoorsman can rely on is luck. But he didn't suffer...

From: Brian M.
12-Dec-23
A few years ago I was hunting on the ground for deer with my longbow. A spike buck gave me a 17 yard shot. I watched my wood arrow curve right on the left facing buck. I thought I hit a twig, but it was an untuned arrow. It hit the deer in his left hip. I was so disappointed. I waited an hour and went to see what I could. Good blood from the get go. I found the arrow 20 yards away, in perfect condition, then found him around 80 yards from impact. Luckily I hit the femoral and he bled out quickly. Later on I shot the arrow again and it curved right again. I stripped and retuned all of my arrows.

From: Tony
12-Dec-23

Tony 's embedded Photo
Tony 's embedded Photo
Made a inexperienced mistake on this guy and a nasty cross wind blew my arrow way back. Hit him right ahead of the hips. Was lucky and hit an artery and he was down in under 100 yards

From: Beendare
12-Dec-23
I did not witness this one..but two reliable witnesses did.

They were on an African hunt with some other hunters they didn't know. They were driving and saw a herd of Zebra that the one stranger said he wanted to shoot. The guide told him that he would have to shoot quick because as soon as they stopped the truck, they would be on the move.

They get 40y from the Zebras and stop, he piles out and for some reason the one in the herd just stood there dumbfounded. This guy takes a hurried shot with my buddies and the guide all looking through binos and they see the arrow bounce in the rocks at the Zebras hoofs....and it takes off.

My buddies are literally laughing, the guy gets in the truck humiliated...and the guide who still has the binos on the zebra says, "We better go take a look at that arrow, that zebra is limping"

Sure enough, the zebra was hit in the hoof and it's actually bleeding pretty good. They get back in the truck as it's wide open country and come on the Zebra but push it and cannot get a shot. After about 2 miles of this the Zebra just tips over dead, Bled out and they drive right up to it. The guy caught some artery right above the hoof.

>

From: Pole Mtn
12-Dec-23
"Pretty much every shot over 60 at a live standing animal that actually hit and killed the animal." This is right on x-man. A couple years ago I drew a late season Blacktail tag. After practicing diligently all summer I felt confident when a nice 4x4 presented a 60 yard broadside shot while relaxing in the sun. I was below him and across a gully. Just as I squeezed my release he happened to take one step down and toward me. What was tight behind the shoulder turned into bottom of throat and out through the top of his back. It was a longer track job but I luckily nicked an artery and got him. Good reminder of why we try to get close.

From: Zbone
12-Dec-23
redquebec - That is the exact hit on the buck I posted at the top, almost the same scenario too... As said above, he never even kicked, only his tail quivered a few seconds...

"there's a junction where the base of the skull meets the top vertebra of the neck, the atlas. The neurology that passes through that junction is the brainstem (medulla oblongata) which contains the neurological innervation for the heart and lungs. Sever that and the heart and lungs cease to have any nerve signals."

I always wonder how/why he died so fast from an arrow without even kicking... Thanks for sharing the scientific definition...

Now the doe I accidently head shot was WAY, different, she flopped around bawling, it was not pretty, I still feel bad about it...8^(((

From: JohnMC
12-Dec-23
I wonder if it was legal to shoot the bird that Cortax/GF yourself shot????

From: Brotsky
12-Dec-23
Luckiest shot I ever made was on a flying rooster pheasant. I was walking back to my truck from a long sit and noticed quite a few pheasants in a grass strip on the way back to where I was parked. I knocked an arrow and thought I'd try to sneak up on them and get one on the ground. As I got close, I drew back and the bird I was after busted me and flushed. I was already drawn back so I tracked in front of him and let her rip. There was a plowed bean field as a backdrop for half a mile, so I knew my arrow was of no harm to anything and I figured what did I have to lose other than $25? Ha! Well, that arrow killed that rooster stone dead, but I never did find it. So, I lost $25 anyway but I did get my pheasant!

From: fuzzy
12-Dec-23
This one time, at Band Camp.....

From: ahunter76
12-Dec-23
I have few that come to mind on small game. 1-Hunting with 4 shotgunners & arrowed a flying Pheasant b/4 any of them pulled the trigger. 2-Running Rabbit after my 2 buddies missed with their shotguns. 3-Walking back to my truck with a 2 buddies after checking a Bear Bait. A Grouse 20 yds away sitting on a stump & I say, 5 Bucks I can shoot his head off. Pure luck for sure but I "did" exactly that & it was with a Recurve. No one would believe these but I had someone "there" that witnessed it.. Even a blind Squirrel finds a nut once in awhile.

From: Basil
12-Dec-23
We shot 7 deer on a late December bow drive. I shot 2 & watched them both go down. After all the chaos my buddy said hey Chuck your deer is over here. I said not mine, I’ve got the two I shot at. Turns out I shot a buck & the arrow passed thru & killed a third doe.

From: Knifeman
12-Dec-23
I saw an old former hunting partner , much to my dismay, shoot a forkhorn buck at 80 yards standing in a cornfield. It was back when the dynabow first came out. As the arrow was flying to him, he went to bite scratch his side and the arrow pinned his head to his side and he dropped dead . All we could hear was a loud click.

From: WhattheFOC
12-Dec-23
I had hunted in Africa that summer, and never touched the bow again until the first time I went out for wt back at home. I had a chip shot, broadside shot at 18 yards. The buck had his head down but must have heard me draw, because he looked at me just as I squeezed it off. Thwack!! I wasn’t sure where the arrow hit, but I knew something wasn’t right. I took up the obvious blood trail, and began to see blood 6 feet up in the willows. The blood trail made sense when I reached the dead deer - the arrow was about 10” deep, right between the eyeballs - broadhead nestled in the neck at the base of the skull. Blood had been shooting out the top of the buck’s head as he ran thru the bush. When I got home I found that the windage on my bow had jiggled loose in transit and was about 3/4” left of where it should be.

From: Treeline
12-Dec-23

Treeline's embedded Photo
Treeline's embedded Photo
This was probably my luckiest shot. My first time hunting Columbian Blacktails and first time trying. Lucky to have just been there and had the opportunity!

I shot him as he passed by at 25 yards on a rut trot.

The arrow hit high… I thought I may have just cut his backstraps!

Took a while to find him in the rain. The arrow actually hit high at the back of the ribs and exited half way between the ribs and hind leg.

By far my best critter of all time…

From: TonyBear
12-Dec-23
Dad used to tell of a story where a bedded buck was shot by a friend on the last day of the season. Unfortunately, it wasn't a mortal wound however they trailed it all the next day and followed the blood that showed up every step. Very cold, had to get the warden to verify the kill since it was after season and in them days(1950s) they had to inspect all archery kills. Only wound they could find was a sliced foot pad.

When I was a kid there was a skull in my uncle's sporting goods bait store from a buck shot in the brain while running, 97 paces. Recurve bow, cedar shaft.

Personally, shot an 8 pt buck at 40 yards as he paused in between the narrow crotch of two really big oak trees. Have him mounted in my man cave, been there for decades.

More recently my nephew was scouting a leased hunting area and with his Dad they came upon a bedded buck off of the logging road. No weapon nor camo. Sooooo... they rushed back to the truck got the bow, stalked back down the road and shot the buck in his bed. Nice 8 pointer, appeared healthy, why he just sat there nobody knows.

12-Dec-23
Shot at a buck and knew immediately it was an awful shot. Much to my shock he died within 30 yards, shot in his back leg, hit the femoral artery.

From: Beendare
13-Dec-23
Treeline, Dang…thats a crusher BT

From: Zbone
13-Dec-23
Speaking of femoral artery, reminds me of the first deer I killed when a kid... Shot it with a little Stevens single shot .22 LR rimfire from probably around 50 yards or so... Hit the little button buck in the ham, it ran a few yards, and died within a few minutes right there in front of me... I was a kid, didn't know at the time, can only assume now the tiny bullet hit the femoral artery... True story...

From: sitO
13-Dec-23
I made a poor first shot on this Jake, way back in 2009, and then got lucky on a 60yd finisher(shot sequence starts around 2:45).

Turkey...Bow-No-Blind from Kyle on Vimeo.

From: Rock
13-Dec-23
Rabbit hunting one winter and a cottontail runs out after someone missed it, it ran into a sagebrush and stopped. A good friend who was really deadly on rabbits stated he was going over there to kill it so I decided I did not need to go. Surprisingly he missed and the rabbit came running out heading uphill, so i pulled up and lead it then shot. That rabbit and my arrow met at another sagebrush (50 yards away) with my arrow killing it cleanly. One of the other guys said that rabbit ran right into your arrow and I told that was what it was supposed to do.

That was one of 6 rabbits I killed on the run that weekend.

From: redquebec
13-Dec-23
Zbone, I don't post often, but it was your picture that prompted me to contribute to this thread. As soon as I saw your picture I thought.. "Oh, another pulled off the same shot that I did!"

Shocking how quickly that animals's life was just ....gone. It was actually cool in some ways, a very surgical strike kind of occurrence. Like I said, I knew what happened right away. There are nuclei in the brainstem whose sole purpose is to maintain the coordinated rhythm of heart beat and diaphragmatic breathing. Cut those and you pull the plug on the whole system. It's a short blood trail.

Nice buck BTW.

From: KB
13-Dec-23
Didn’t Tom Miranda shoot the pecker off a Roosevelt bull and kill it? That one probably wins for me. :)

From: Wilburness
14-Dec-23
Luckiest shot my wife saw. Dear, I am going for a walk and do some stump shooting wanna go? You aren't going to kill anything are you? Just stumps. I am killing the stumps. A woodcock flies and and lands. The wire on the judo point takes the head off. Flopping bird and blood every where. She saw it all go down, now we have tears, but was able to get over it,we had him for lunch.

14-Dec-23
I took a gal duck hunting for a first date last winter, some mallards landed up the river from us 30-40 yards away and I told her if she can get a clear shot on them to go ahead and let it rip. In the fumbling around to get in position they spooked and started flying off. I took a few steps into the river and at this point they were every bit of 70-80 yards away and flying straight away from us. I let it rip anyway, I couldn’t take her hunting and not get a bird after all, and incredibly one dropped. I acted like it was an incredibly routine occurrence of course, but was 100% just a single lucky bb that found its mark.

From: Zbone
14-Dec-23

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Thanks redquebec... My scenario was just slightly different than yours, I was in a tree (Halloween Eve of '01, back when I could still climb trees...8^)) and although he wasn't trailing a hot doe that I know of (been there a while and no does came through if I remember, but heck that was 22 years ago...8^)) but he had that neck extended at a fast walk, he was cruising for does though...

Heard him coming but only had maybe 5 seconds once seeing him if I wanted to shoot... Then next thing happened to me when I seen him drop was shock, then trying to compose thinking he was going get up and I started fumbling for another arrow out of my quiver and by the time I got another one nocked, then realized he hadn't even moved... It all happened fast... Was still a little leery getting out of the tree hoping he didn't get up and run, but once I reached him realized he was stone dead... First photo was exactly how he fell and laid before I even touched him... Yeah, short blood trail, heck the only blood was the little seen in the photos...8^)

Again, thanks for the info and sharing Stephen, take care...

From: Pat Lefemine
14-Dec-23
10 years ago, with my kansas outfitter watching, along with another hunter helping - we were following up on a wounded buck that I had shot earlier in the morning and let sit for 7 hours. We bumped him into the pasture. I ranged him at 115 yards and let him fly. My longest pin was 60 so I just kinda gapped the same distance. I drilled him. The outfitter said he could hear the arrow in flight for about 1 second and talks about it to this day.

I could never recreate that, I barely practice more than 50 yards. All luck.

From: RK
14-Dec-23
Pat All luck and a lifetime of shooting a bow to practice and for fun. Great story

From: tobywon
14-Dec-23
Several years ago a doe come running in and she stopped broadside at 20 yards. I quickly drew back, put my pin behind the shoulder and just as I released she started running again. The arrow hit her high at the base of the tail. I knew right away it was a bad shot, but saw blood immediately. Called my brother and he came over. We were looking for blood, when we heard a noise out in front and it was her thrashing around. Clipped the artery, she ran up the hill and then came back down and died. I never thanked God so much, because I felt awful with the shot location.

Probably the most lucky shot I ever saw was a duck my brother got when we were younger. This duck was so high up in the air, there was no way I thought anyone would hit it. I didnt even think of raising my gun up. I was surprised to see my brother shoot and this thing fell deader than anything. I think its still falling today, that's how long it seemed to take for the duck to fall to the ground.

From: redquebec
14-Dec-23
Here's one: When i was a teenager growing up in Massachusetts we had a friend of the family that bow hunted with us and he had a reputation for being lucky. Lucky is a bit of a slippery slope, if you're consistently lucky it's usually a combination of preparedness and opportunity as the expression goes.

Well on one particular hunt he had a broadside shot at a doe at 30 yards, kind of far but he thought he could make it. She was standing on the apex of a ridge after a fresh snow fall. He aims a little high due to the distance and releases an arrow. The arrow sailed an inch over her back and then he hears what sounds like deer running off just over the ridge line. The doe runs off and the woods go silent so he goes over the ridge line to look for his arrow. He sees a lot of fresh tracks in the snow and...BLOOD!

He follows the bloodtrail and discovers a huge mature 8 point dead within 75 yards from a perfect double lung shot. He had a great time celebrating his "luck" with us at camp that night. My father just shook his head all night telling the rest of us, "See I told you Dennis is lucky."

From: Live2Hunt
14-Dec-23
You mean like shooting at a buck without my glasses because they were broke and hitting the doe behind it and killing the doe? Yup, did that. I also know a guy, who I believe comes on here but will not admit this, that told of a great heart shot he made on a mulie buck at long yardage only to find out the buck wheeled as the arrow was flying. The deer was broadside, but the arrow hit the deer in the front then hit the heart.

From: Scar Finga
14-Dec-23
A few for me... I used to shoot barebow and I smoked a really nice Mullie at 58 yards frontal shot, he died in 10 seconds. My 560-grain arrow was sticking almost all the way out his bung hole with only the fletching holding it in. Mind you I used to shoot a ton!

I shot a squirrel dead center in the chest off a tree limb at 52 yards on a bet and smoked a javelina through the heart at 79 yards on steep downhill shot, he took 3 steps and rolled down the mountain. Thats it for me!

I've seen some crazy stuff though, some of which I won't share here!!!

From: BUCKeye
14-Dec-23
1. Buddy was hunting about 100 yds uphill of me. I see a buck near him and he shoots and I hear a solid thump. Buck comes running past me at full speed about 30 yds out. I figure I can only help to get another arrow in it and lead it and fling one. Buck runs 20 yds and piles up. Turns out my buddy missed and hit a log. I 12-ringed the buck with a perfect shot.

2. Huge bodied buck cruising for does steps into opening in a thicket. No time to range him, my brain screams 30 yds. Turns out his body was so big he was actually 40 yds and fooled me. I bleat to stop him and he pegs me on full alert. I hold 30 low to account for him ducking. He doesn't duck and I see my arrow hit a log right behind his front leg at knee level. Deer doesn't run far and stands there increasingly panting and walks off. My arrow is clean and something about his reaction made me look harder. Was shocked to find good blood and followed a short way to the dead buck. 1 blade of my broadhead barely nicked the edge of his leg and must have cut an artery. So glad I looked for him.

3. I have some heart breaking misses that counter all the luck used by those shots :-(

From: badbull
15-Dec-23
Years ago I arrowed a 4 point mule deer between the toes of his front hoof and was able to recover him after he laid down. He limped off about 75 yards to a clump of Aspen. I stalked to within 15 yards or so and spine shot him. The broadhead on the initial shot was a Bodkin or Zuicky Black Diamond ( I don't remember which). The lucky part is that on the first shot there was no blood at all (just two small marks where the blades hit between the hoof toes).

From: mick
15-Dec-23
my second yr. hunting I was a small kid so my bow was 35Lb. pull. So had a few deer come walking by at 10 yds. I shot at deers right broadside. Hit the deer dead center of the left side ham. But luckily hit the artery crazy blood trail. So at 10 yards that deer completely turned around by the time I let go of the string and arrow hitting. I suppose that ole 1980 bear compound was sailing them arrows at what maybe a sizzling 100 mph.

From: 12yards
15-Dec-23
I've had several shots on deer where, when I found them I've said, well that was totally God. Spine shots, dorsal sorta, femoral artery.

From: Beendare
16-Dec-23
Am I the only guy thats cringing a little bit on Reds story of an arrow siling over the hill and killing an unseen buck? Sorry red but that one doesnt sit well with me.

From: gil_wy
16-Dec-23
I shot a muley right in the ear when it reached back lick it’s flank right when I released… DRT but sure got the ticker racing!!!

From: ahawkeye
16-Dec-23
Someone on here had an old bison vertebra that had a stone arrow head embedded in it. I wasn't there for the shot but I'd call it pretty lucky. If they didn't own that piece I think they knew someone who did.

From: fuzzy
16-Dec-23
One of the Wensels had the bison vertebra

From: Candor
16-Dec-23

Candor's embedded Photo
Candor's embedded Photo
Timely discussion. One I shot yesterday

From: Zbone
16-Dec-23
Candor, did it drop dead or still alive?

From: Candor
16-Dec-23
dropped like he got hit by a sledge hammer but he lived for a minute (or so I perceive as he kicked a few times) it severed his spine and got the carotid artery (I believe).

From: mick
16-Dec-23
A buddy shot at a nice buck hit a small maple tree about 3" dia. the arrow had about 1/2 arrow sticking out on both sides of the tree. Well the buck was close enough that the arrow JUST stuck in far enough to pierce the heart. If that deer would have been a few inches further away it would fine.

From: redquebec
16-Dec-23
Beendare, it didn't sit well with anyone else at camp either. The guys demanded to go to the "scene of the crime" the next day to look at the tracks in the snow and piece the story together to see if he was pulling everyone's leg. It all added up apparently. The consensus was he would have never known and never looked for a deer, let alone find it, if it wasn't for a fresh snow fall.

I was 15 years old and gullible enough to think it wasn't a big deal. I had shot at numerous 3d courses where arrows sail and go a long way down range, so I just figured, that's what happened, Dennis got lucky, no biggie, a likely story.

Until I went to school and told all the other kids who hunt and got laughed at for quite a while. 40 years later and I'm still getting grief... :)

From: Beendare
18-Dec-23
Sorry bro….I should have held my tongue

From: Stoneman
18-Dec-23
There are lucky shots and then there are bad shots that turned out “lucky”. Then there are some that I would call “dumb luck”.

A few years ago, just as I was about to pack it in for the day, a nice pronghorn buck appeared on the horizon. I adjusted my shooting position in the blind to the window he would most likely provide the best shot. I was ready and the buck looked committed. Just about then a badger decided to get a drink from the water spilling out of the stock tank. This caused the buck to alter his approach leaving me no open shooting window. The older double bull blinds have a horizontal window between the two vertical shooting windows that is screened. This was going to be my only option. I adjusted and decided I was going to take that shot through the screen. I drew my bow and when he presented a broadside view, I let the arrow fly. There was an immediate and loud smack on the blind just below the window. The buck pulled back from the tank and took off on a dead run. I was heartbroken and I saw a 3-blade cut through the blind material just below the screened window. I quickly stuck my head out the side window to see what happened to the buck. To my surprise he ran about 50 yards and cartwheeled to his death. My shot hit only a couple inches above where I was aiming (just above where the brown and white hair make a right angle). Upon examination of the blind my arrow went perfectly through the blind material just missing the double stitched seams and material overlap of the window frame and above the fiberglass poles.

I am going with dumb luck on this one.

From: LeeBuzz
18-Dec-23
Once shot a javelina at 20 yards. Arrow did a double lung pass-through, then skipped off the ground at 30 yards, and then witnessed my arrow cut down a 5' x 1.5" pine sapling at 45 yards. Thankfully my best friend was with me watching which way the javy went since I got a little distracted watching the tree fall over.

Little turd burrowed underneath dry debris in the bend of a wash we were next to. Left hardly any sign of his Houdini attempt.

From: JB
20-Dec-23
Shot at a doe at about 30 yards that I thought was relaxed. Wrong! She turned inside out wheeling back the way she came from. Thought my arrow was going to hit her in the head but it just missed her face. Saw it hit her in the backstraps. Was very irritated with myself but gave her some time. After a long track job of finding a drop here and a drop there, I find her right before giving up. Arrow passed thru her backstraps and over the guts lodging in her back leg right at the ball joint. Glad I'm stubborn.

From: KHunter
21-Dec-23
with future wife in tow as I deer hunted in SW Colo, a grouse flew up and drilled it mid air at about 30 yards with broadhead tipped arrow. That was a good dinner that night.

From: bowhunt
21-Dec-23

bowhunt's embedded Photo
bowhunt's embedded Photo
bowhunt's embedded Photo
bowhunt's embedded Photo
bowhunt's embedded Photo
bowhunt's embedded Photo
In may of 2017 one of my best friends that I do all my backpack elk hunts with since 2013 had a heart attack. It was pretty touch and go how things would go. Right before elk season, his doctor gave him a clean bull of health. I told him to make sure to tell the doctor we backpack hunt some of the nastiest country Oregon has.

Opening weekend we took our time getting out to our favorite spike camp almost 6 miles from the road. It took longer than normal, but it felt like a huge accomplishment just being ther. The second evening we were about 1.5 miles out a finger ridge we like I did a few quiet cow calls. Immediately I heard some faint hoof steps very close by. I whispered for Tim to knock an arrow, an moved back 50 yards over the ridge. I did some more quiet cow/calf calls while kicking some rocks and sticks. It wasn’t long, and I heard Tim cow call…then nothing. He should have shot by now, so I do a few more cow and calf chirps. I heard his bow shoot, and an elk run down the steep finger ridge. I I didn’t hear the elk run a long ways, but didn’t hear a crash either. The hill is super steep, so hard to tell what happened.

After a moment we got together and he said he shot the bullperfect.

30 minutes later we took up the blood trail. It was about 150 yards straight down a STEEP hill to the bull tangled up in the trees. As we were hugging and high fiving, I didn’t see a hole in the rib cage.

After moving the elk we figured out the broadhead hit on the front edge of the front leg right below the elbow and Deflected right up into the heart!

After having a heart attack in May, Tim had his lucky heart attack backcountry Oregon Bull!

You couldn’t wipe the smile off our faces for quite some time.

From: stealthycat
22-Dec-23
my arrow deflected on my first bull kill and cut the jugular - did not go far

a guy I know hit a bull hard quarter away - the arrow ran up the top of the ribs, top of should, into the back of neck - never entered the body cavity ... he pushed that bull for a long ways until he could get a second shot - it bled very heavily

From: So467
25-Dec-23
Early 90’s my buddy just got the newly released Delta ram target. We set it up in my yard and as we turn to walk away a big fly lands just outside the ten ring. We get back to our bows and lo and behold that fly is still there! I ask if I can shoot it. He responds if I don’t see guts it does not count. Well it was splattered for sure. Another time rabbit hunting with a bow bunny was running up hill at a solid 65 yards lead him and hit him in the back of the head and came out through its nose.

From: bowhunter24
25-Dec-23
I shot a buck that ran in a half circle about 30 yds and flipped head over heels, his rack stuck in the mud feet up in the air. He kicked a couple of times and died. I field dressed him where he landed, and had to work to get his rack out of the ground.

From: fuzzy
26-Dec-23
I didn't see it but Matt "Grey Ghost" recently missed a coyote so close it died from the shock. (Sorry Matt/GG just "funning" you)

From: nchunter
26-Dec-23
The very first deer I ever shot at and killed for me. I was 20 feet up in a treestand and saw a five pointer at 35 yards walking broadside to me. He was just getting reading to walk behind a small maple tree. I aimed on the other side of the tree and fired without evern having the deer in sight. He miraculously walked perfectly into a great broadside shot. He walked 5 feet and fell into a 15 feet mine shaft. Not in a millions years would I take that shot now.

27-Dec-23
I’ve had many a lucky shot, this years Oklahoma buck was real lucky. Angle was real steep and ever so slightly quartering towards me…any higher or closer to the shoulder and I’d have had a bad shot on my hands. Either he ducked or I shot high

From: bluedog
27-Dec-23
One of the shots I did I turned out really liking. Elk hunt nw of Flagstaff, That year I had no 4 wd, was using my astro van. Scouting I'd found a half acre clearing in the middle of jack pine . Had a big down tree in se corner even, 4 good trails coming out of jack pines. Only a little ove 1/4 mile from forest road where I could park my van.

I set up by downed tree roots and waited with thermos of coffee and snacks. About 10:00 5 cows came out of a trail into clearing. Stood broadside a little past a tree I had marked at 40 yards. I drew and took aim at a good one and shot. I hit a tad high but was a double lung hit, She took off running and staggering. Knew it was a good hit but high, I followed and soon saw a brown blob laying on ground.

SEVEN YARDS from my parked van! Nice , Lucky , and great end result.

From: Bowfreak
27-Dec-23
I have a few to mention.

1) My group of hunting buddies started bowhunting in the 80s. Me in the late 80s and my friend more in the early to mid 80s. He and his brother hunted together and they hunted an area that was absolutely over ran with deer. One time they were walking back to the truck after a morning set when they crossed a powerline right of way. They noticed a spike feeding out in the RoW about 125 yards away. Being a goofy kid, my buddy drew back his old whitetail hunter and pointed it to the sky and let one fly. The arrow came dropping in like a lawn dart and he clipped the buck on the back of the leg just above the hoof. It bled like crazy and they were able to track it down and recover it.

2)Opening morning for spring turkey in KY about 20 years ago I am setting on the edge of a very large pasture. I can see about 300 yards to the top of the ridge. At fly down 3 gobblers came out and started strutting. They see my decoy and slowly start strutting to me. They get to what I think is about the edge of my shooting range and they suddenly start strutting back the way they came. I am not sure what happened until I glance back up to the ridge and see a hen standing up there. They were actually spread out quite a bit and were going to soon be out of range. I put the bead of my shotgun on the top of the head of the one to the far left. I squeezed the trigger and never knocked a feather out of that bird but killed the one to the far right graveyard dead. Obviously these birds were quite a bit farther than I thought. :)

3)I am not at all proud of this for several reasons and I would really categorize this one as unlucky as I wish it was a complete miss. This is a shot I should have never taken PERIOD. I was hunting a stand on the edge of a food plot one evening in early October. 3 does came by and had no idea I was in the woods. I picked out the biggest one for what was a slam dunk shot at 18 yards. Somehow I shoot under the doe. They had no clue what had happened and they hurried to the farthest point from me in the plot. They stood looking around for a few minutes and then went to calmly feeding. I watched them for several minutes. I watched them feed calmly for quite a while. At least 10 minutes or so. I had been shooting as much and as good as I had ever in my life at that point. They were standing at around 50 yards and I was confident I could place a good clean shot on one of the does. I never even considered that the deer could or would move at this point. I dialed my sight to the exact yardage and came to full draw and calmly started my shot process. The pin was right on the money when the shot broke. Looking back I had made a perfect shot. The problem was I literally could see this deer start moving when my arrow was towards the highest point of its flight path. The arrow hit home with a loud crack. When the deer wheeled to run I could see my arrow pointed straight up into the air with a glowing lighted nock sticking up like a running light on a boat. I watched her run through a field with knee high grass and disappear into the woods about 150 yards away. I was beyond sick immediately but knew I needed to get down asap as it was getting dark and I couldn't assume there would be blood to follow in the tall grass. I walked right to the spot where I saw her enter the woods. She was laying right there, dead. The arrow had went dead center through her mouth and was sticking out the back of her head. There wasn't a scratch on its upper or lower jaws, lips or teeth. Evidently when the deer was running off it took off with its head cocked back and nose pointed in the air. I have no idea how the deer was able to run away given the exit of the shot.

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