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What Is This Hanging?
Whitetail Deer
Contributors to this thread:
Zbone 23-Dec-23
fuzzy 23-Dec-23
JohnMC 23-Dec-23
Zbone 23-Dec-23
Nick Muche 23-Dec-23
Zbone 23-Dec-23
btnbuck 23-Dec-23
walleyes 23-Dec-23
Aspen Ghost 24-Dec-23
Shug 24-Dec-23
huntr4477 24-Dec-23
Insheart 24-Dec-23
Bou'bound 24-Dec-23
Zbone 24-Dec-23
ki-ke 24-Dec-23
arlone 24-Dec-23
Zbone 24-Dec-23
Zbone 11-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 11-Jan-24
Zbone 11-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 11-Jan-24
Zbone 11-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 11-Jan-24
4nolz@work 11-Jan-24
pappy 11-Jan-24
Old Reb 11-Jan-24
Zbone 11-Jan-24
Old Reb 12-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 12-Jan-24
4nolz@work 12-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 12-Jan-24
Zbone 14-Jan-24
btnbuck 14-Jan-24
Zbone 14-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 14-Jan-24
Zbone 14-Jan-24
Zbone 14-Jan-24
Bwhnt 14-Jan-24
Zbone 16-Jan-24
Rhody hunter 16-Jan-24
Pop-r 16-Jan-24
Keefers 16-Jan-24
Zbone 16-Jan-24
scentman 18-Jan-24
From: Zbone
23-Dec-23

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
What is hanging from the belly of the doe on the right?

Except for the thing, she looks healthy and eats good...

It almost looks like her guts are hanging...

From: fuzzy
23-Dec-23
Looks like a tumor

From: JohnMC
23-Dec-23
Looks like something behind her

From: Zbone
23-Dec-23
No John, it's attached to her belly...

From: Nick Muche
23-Dec-23
It’s not a tuma

From: Zbone
23-Dec-23

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Here is other views...

I think it's her guts... If it is, that is amazing...

From: btnbuck
23-Dec-23
Where is the picture from that they are feeding the deer in elevated feeders? They might have an idea.

From: walleyes
23-Dec-23

walleyes's embedded Photo
walleyes's embedded Photo

From: Aspen Ghost
24-Dec-23

Aspen Ghost's Link
Could be deer warts.

From: Shug
24-Dec-23
Possibly fiberoma..

From: huntr4477
24-Dec-23
I have some pictures on my phone of a small buck that comes through my yard almost every morning. He's covered in fibromas! I wish I could figure out how to post pics on here.

From: Insheart
24-Dec-23

From: Bou'bound
24-Dec-23
Mammary neuroma

From: Zbone
24-Dec-23
In the video, it looks like dried guys too me... Look at the last photo I posted when she turns left, notice the lumps...

From: ki-ke
24-Dec-23
I agree with Shug. Looks like a large fibroma. Seen it on a few deer over the years

From: arlone
24-Dec-23
Looks like the Brownsville Deer Pantry, I'll have to watch it more often. What walleyes posted sounds possible?

From: Zbone
24-Dec-23
"Looks like the Brownsville Deer Pantry"

Yeah, I posted that over on the Annual Shed Thread with links...

From: Zbone
11-Jan-24

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
She is still doing fine, look just past the buck's head...

From: Grey Ghost
11-Jan-24
I read this guy puts out 800 pounds of oats, daily, and unnaturally concentrates hundreds of deer every winter. Maine biologists suggest he may be doing more harm than good. Perhaps this doe's belly goiter is related to that.

Matt

From: Zbone
11-Jan-24
"unnaturally concentrates hundreds of deer every winter"

Not true, Maine deer yard every winter:

"Started streaming on Dec 1, 2023 The Brownville Food Pantry For Deer feeds up to 800 pounds of native oats and at least a bushel of apples per day to help sustain the white-tailed deer population through rough winters here in Brownville, Maine. Feeding happens daily around 08:00(8AM) to 09:00(9 AM) Eastern Standard Time starting December 16 and continues to around the beginning of April. These are wild deer and this is not a deer farm. Some of the deer have been coming for more than 10 years. At times there are 200+ deer at the pantry. Wild turkeys also come and eat the native oats along side the deer. There is no Chronic Wasting Disease, or CWD in wild deer in Maine. Please don't complain about it in chat. These deer are all very healthy and there has never been any type of disease spread among these deer. This "Yarding" of deer happens in Maine every winter, even if they were not being fed. You may see deer that are lame. Experts tell us that leaving them alone is the best thing we can do for them. Thank you for watching!"

From: Grey Ghost
11-Jan-24
So, is that paragraph written by the owner of Brownville, or an actual biologist? Have the deer actually been tested for diseases, or overall health? Sorry, I'm skeptical of any program that "yards" that many deer in an area that wouldn't sustain them naturally.

Matt

From: Zbone
11-Jan-24
You mean school boy sit behind the computer biologists or the family and owner of the site that has been feeding them over a decade...

What's the difference if they eat locally grown oats out of a trough or out of a oats food plot... They still congregate is a close "yard" area in bad weather...

"Maine biologists suggest he may be doing more harm than good"

What are these said biologists credentials and experience, (or you don't even know, you just think you know) but I'll accept the knowledge of the experienced family...

From: Grey Ghost
11-Jan-24

Grey Ghost's Link
"What are these said biologists credentials and experience".

I can't comment on their credentials, only to say they work for the Maine Department of Wildlife.

UNDESIRED IMPACTS OF WINTER FEEDING

• Feeding deer in late fall may disrupt deer migration to natural wintering areas.

• Feeding concentrates deer in smaller areas reducing size and effectiveness of trail networks.

• Concentrating deer in smaller areas can create a feeding ground for predators.

• Concentrating deer in smaller areas may increase their vulnerability to diseases such as Chronic Wasting Disease.

• Concentrating deer in smaller areas can literally kill all vegetation within their reach over one to several hundred acres, impacting regeneration and reducing the forest’s ability to shelter deer in the future.

• May cause long-term impacts on deer behavior as they lose their wariness toward people.

• Feeding sites near homes also place deer at greater risk of death from free-roaming dogs.

• Feeding sites can significantly increase deer/vehicle collisions.

• Deer may actually starve when fed supplemental foods during winter if they have a full belly of indigestible foods; many deer have starved to death with stomachs packed full of hay.

• Providing inadequate amounts of supplemental foods can actually cause malnutrition in normally healthy deer populations.

• Spoiled or moldy feed may be ingested and can be fatal.

• Introducing a sugary diet to a deer used to eating a fiber-rich diet of browse can also lead to rapid death.

• Deer compete aggressively for scarce, high-quality foods and only the strongest, most dominant deer (who would have survived the winter anyway) gain access to food, while deer most vulnerable to starvation in winter (usually fawns) are denied access to supplemental feed by more aggressive deer . • Deer may die from eating too much feed at one time.

• Ending a feeding operation prematurely will lead to nutritional problems for deer that have become de- pendent on winter feeding, as will beginning a feeding operation too late.

• Winter feeding is expensive; one deer requires 2 to 5 lbs of feed per day depending on the quality of feed.

• The best option is to not feed deer at all, but if you choose to please read on.

Matt

From: 4nolz@work
11-Jan-24
"belly goiter" made my day thanks

From: pappy
11-Jan-24

pappy's embedded Photo
pappy's embedded Photo
Got this picture 2019 trail camera.

From: Old Reb
11-Jan-24
You can watch these deer feeding in real time on YouTube. They have a camera rolling at the feed troughs.

From: Zbone
11-Jan-24
4nolz - What causes "belly goiter" ? I'll bet my paycheck it isn't caused by these folks feeding them...

Old Reb - There are 4 different "live" views of the Pantry, I've posted the links multiple times on this site...

From: Old Reb
12-Jan-24
Z, I apparently missed that. I happened to see it on YouTube so I was just letting people know.

From: Grey Ghost
12-Jan-24
"I'll bet my paycheck it isn't caused by these folks feeding them..."

LOL. Now who's playing "boy sit behind the computer biologist"? I noticed you didn't comment on the Maine Dept of Wildlife's recommendation to not feed the deer in winter, or any of their reasons why. I guess you think you know what's best for the deer.

Matt

From: 4nolz@work
12-Jan-24
goiter is goiter its not goiter,my guess thats just commonly misused slang for fibroma.

From: Grey Ghost
12-Jan-24
Yeah, I used "belly goiter" for lack of a better term. I thought fibroma were wart like growths that develop all over the deer's body. This doesn't look like it, but maybe it comes in different forms.

Matt

12-Jan-24
"feed induced fibroma" (or more commonly knows as "bait belly") for sure.

yet another reason why baiting and feeding will be the end of all deer. :)

From: Zbone
14-Jan-24
GG - Have read for years the debate of supplement feeding you linked and not to the degree of the Pantry but have supplement fed shelled corn 365 days a year for 15 years for all the local critters and I feel it benefits wildlife much like a bird feeder or a food plot or a farmers field, and I personally know it helped injured and crippled deer through winters, so I agree the the Pantry site's statement and we can just agree to disagree...

From: btnbuck
14-Jan-24
GG, maybe go back and read page 3 of your link. Looks to me like they're doing everything suggested there and are willing to keep it up until spring. (not just until the end of hunting season)

From: Zbone
14-Jan-24
I agree btnbuck, once started must keep it up until spring green-up and the last weeks before are hardest on them when most or all of their fat reserves are gone...

From: Grey Ghost
14-Jan-24
btnbuck, I did read the whole article. I also think there are reasons the Maine Division of Wildlife's recommendation is: • The best option is to not feed deer at all......

Matt

From: Zbone
14-Jan-24

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
She still kicking and came close to the camera today... Here is a series of pix...

From: Zbone
14-Jan-24

Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
Zbone's embedded Photo
The thing actually dangles and in the video I think I seen it move... I think it's actually exposed guts, notice the ripples and the white...

From: Bwhnt
14-Jan-24
Bad case of mastitis I'm betting.

From: Zbone
16-Jan-24
What do you think 4nolz?

From: Rhody hunter
16-Jan-24
Wow that is strange

From: Pop-r
16-Jan-24
That's a CWD haven.

From: Keefers
16-Jan-24

Keefers's embedded Photo
Keefers's embedded Photo
I got pictures watching the pantry last night and she was right in front of the camera . When she walked away every time she took steps she would pick up that right rear leg like she was getting ready to scratch an itch before she set it down. Other than that she seems fine but only time will tell. I’m not a fan of this deer pantry and I think it interferes with the natural instincts of deer movement and patterns . I also don’t hunt over bait piles but that’s just me . The deer pantry is getting more and more deer coming especially this time of year and the property owners do keep most of the feed off the ground and each box is nearly empty by 9:00 am the next day . I really like to read the comments by those who know absolutely nothing about deer .It cracks me up on how they give certain ones names. If you want to waste some of your life’s time go watch it for a few hours a night it will put you to sleep hearing the deer walk up and munch .Better than some of the T.V. Programs these days lol.

From: Zbone
16-Jan-24
'watch it for a few hours a night it will put you to sleep hearing the deer walk up and munch .Better than some of the T.V. Programs these days'

Yep, me too... I agree like listening to all the sounds with the grunts, snorts, sneezes, and what surprised me is how much the bucks snort-wheeze...

As for the doe, I think she somehow got her belly punctured and guts dropped and she is still living through it... If so, truly amazing animals...

From: scentman
18-Jan-24
chad?

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