Sitka Gear
Hole in mountain house packet
Equipment
Contributors to this thread:
DonVathome 25-Jan-24
Nick Muche 25-Jan-24
RonP 25-Jan-24
nmwapiti 25-Jan-24
KB 25-Jan-24
casekiska 25-Jan-24
Grey Ghost 25-Jan-24
JohnMC 25-Jan-24
Nick Muche 25-Jan-24
JohnMC 25-Jan-24
WapitiBob 25-Jan-24
DanaC 25-Jan-24
DonVathome 25-Jan-24
DonVathome 25-Jan-24
Nick Muche 25-Jan-24
APauls 25-Jan-24
Zackman 25-Jan-24
Brotsky 25-Jan-24
Nick Muche 25-Jan-24
Trial153 25-Jan-24
Rut Nut 25-Jan-24
Pole Mtn 25-Jan-24
Blood 25-Jan-24
Aspen Ghost 25-Jan-24
smarba 26-Jan-24
Bowfreak 26-Jan-24
Jaquomo 26-Jan-24
bigeasygator 26-Jan-24
Pop-r 26-Jan-24
DonVathome 31-Jan-24
From: DonVathome
25-Jan-24
If there is a tiny hole in a mountain house meal is that bad? I just got 20 packs from my father's house. A mouse had got into one. I worry that the others might have a tiny hole I miss - I checked closely but I would miss a tiny hole.

From: Nick Muche
25-Jan-24
Terrible news Don!

If you've discovered a tiny hole in one of the mountain house meals, it's advisable to exercise caution. While a small hole might not necessarily mean the entire batch is compromised, it does increase the risk of contamination. Mice and other pests can carry diseases, and their presence in the vicinity of stored food raises concerns.

Here are some steps you can consider:

Inspect Carefully: Thoroughly examine each of the remaining 19 packs for any signs of damage or holes. Pay close attention, even to small punctures that might be easily missed.

Packaging Integrity: Ensure that the packaging of the other meals is intact. If you find any additional holes or damage, it's safer to discard those packs.

Odor and Appearance: Check for any unusual odors or changes in the appearance of the meals. If anything seems off, it's better to err on the side of caution.

Contact the Manufacturer: If you have concerns about the safety of the remaining packs, consider reaching out to the manufacturer. They can provide guidance on whether the meals are still safe for consumption.

Storage: Ensure that the remaining packs are stored in a secure location where pests cannot access them.

It's essential to prioritize food safety, especially when there's a possibility of contamination. If in doubt, it's better to be cautious and avoid consuming potentially compromised food.

From: RonP
25-Jan-24
throw them out, why risk it.

From: nmwapiti
25-Jan-24
I had a lovely $%^&&^$ scenario along these lines a few years back. I unknowingly closed up a cooler full of mountain house with a mouse inside it on a trip. When I opened it up at home, the little sucker had eaten into a dozen meals. I threw away any packs with damage. He only got about a third of them, but that bastard cost me some money. I don't leave coolers with food open at night any more.

From: KB
25-Jan-24

KB's embedded Photo
KB's embedded Photo
Gonna be hard to cook if they do.

From: casekiska
25-Jan-24
I worked in the Quality Assurance Department of a large international food producing company for 32 years. If I were you I would absolutely not take a chance with these meals, the potential for product contamination is too great and if you make a mistake the result may kill you. Simply put, if you value your life, don't chance it.

From: Grey Ghost
25-Jan-24
Aren't they packaged air tight? If so, just squeeze each packet and listen for air coming out. If not, I wouldn't worry about them.

From: JohnMC
25-Jan-24
Nick you using AI? lol

From: Nick Muche
25-Jan-24
John, I’ve come to learn Don values very detailed advice. I’m hoping he can log that information somewhere near his 100 pages of AK Moose information.

From: JohnMC
25-Jan-24
Aren't you taking him fishing in AK this summer?

From: WapitiBob
25-Jan-24
All my Mt House and Peak is in a large tote after an incident. The mouse did save me from the chili mac so there was an upside.

From: DanaC
25-Jan-24
Weigh a package, put it under water for an hour and weigh it again. If there's a leak, it will gain weight.

From: DonVathome
25-Jan-24
DanaC good idea.

I checked every other package and they look flawless otherwise I would have tossed them. The one that was chewed into was much older, different packaging (the old packing). My guess is that it was chewed on a trip before he bought the other packs. I have no desire to take a chance but I thought mnt house meals were ok if opened for years. They have to little air to squeeze and find anything but a big hole, no packs had a big hole, or even a small visible hole. My thoughts are if mnt house are ok opened I will keep them. Cooking with a tiny hole is not an issue, they soak up water way to fast for a tiny hole to leak enough water to cause any issues.

All meals came out of a plastic tub that mice could not get into - and chewed one was under all new ones. No idea why my dad saved it but then again I am going through his house now and I have no idea why he saved several thousand things:)

I am trying to make as much use out of stuff because it gives my parents some satisfaction. They had to leave almost everything when they moved in with my brother and his wife in Las Vegas. My dad specifically asked me to make use of them.

From: DonVathome
25-Jan-24
I threw away all packages in contact with the one with a hole.

From: Nick Muche
25-Jan-24
Good work!! Proud of you Don!

From: APauls
25-Jan-24
lol. Nick's response was straight from Customer Service or Chat GPT one of the two

From: Zackman
25-Jan-24
Nick is highly knowledgeable about obscure things

From: Brotsky
25-Jan-24
At least don didn't ask his question like this:

"If I find myself with a hole in my Mt house pouch in elk area 123 in Wyoming, surrounded be screaming bulls at this specific grid point that I will never hunt again, then what should I do?"

From: Nick Muche
25-Jan-24
If you can't eat the Mountain House, you can always eat the tag!

From: Trial153
25-Jan-24
Funny shit Nick

From: Rut Nut
25-Jan-24
LOL! This sure is a tough crowd! ;-)

From: Pole Mtn
25-Jan-24
Use it, he probably didn't eat much!

From: Blood
25-Jan-24
Check the sign, you can always back out. Or, leave the hole, fill pouch with hot water, go home to bang the wife. Then eat your meal. You’ll still have 7-8 minutes to wait for it to get done cooking by the time you’re done. :)

From: Aspen Ghost
25-Jan-24
When you get up to the mountains the intact ones will puff up a little. Any with holes will not.

From: smarba
26-Jan-24
Sounds like already resolved, but hold underwater and squeeze. If air bubbles come out, toss...

From: Bowfreak
26-Jan-24
Good thread

From: Jaquomo
26-Jan-24
Somewhere there's a mouse with bad farts.....

From: bigeasygator
26-Jan-24
I asked ChatGPT to rewrite Nick’s very thorough advice in the style of the narrator from a Gordon Eastman film. Enjoy.

"Listen up, folks! If you stumble upon a minuscule breach in those mountain house meals, it's time to kick caution into high gear. Now, a tiny hole doesn't mean the whole shebang is in jeopardy, but it sure cranks up the contamination risk. We've got mice and pests lurking around, carrying diseases that could throw a real wrench into your chow plans.

Here's the lowdown, Eastman style:

1. Recon Mission: Dive into the remaining 19 packs like your life depends on it. Hunt down signs of damage or sneaky holes, even the ones trying to play hide-and-seek.

2. Packaging Checkpoint: Make sure the fortress – the packaging – is standing strong. If you spot any additional breaches, it's time to cut ties with those vulnerable packs.

3. Scent and Sight Safari: Sniff out any odd aromas or changes in appearance. Trust your instincts; if it looks or smells off, it probably is.

4. SOS to the Makers: Feeling uneasy about the safety of your remaining stash? Drop a line to the folks who whipped up these meals. They'll steer you clear of culinary danger.

5. Bunker Down: Lock away those remaining packs in a pest-proof stronghold. We can't let critters play havoc with our rations.

In the realm of survival, food safety is the top dog. When in doubt, channel your inner Eastman – be smart, be cautious, and steer clear of any grub that might throw a curveball your way."

From: Pop-r
26-Jan-24
I've had some sort of bugs get in them before as well. They were in a tote and ended up with a tiny hole in them that wasn't from a mouse. The mice are the evil of the world though. I hunted Idaho this last year and I lost a good bit if gear to them. You could drive down the road at night and there were literally hundreds running across the roads. No telling how many I ran over. I will never forget some bucket traps again to help protect my camp.

From: DonVathome
31-Jan-24
FYI all packets were literally immaculate. I checked them 3x and had my kids (better eyesight) check them. I then submerged in in water and squeezed and watched for bubbles. I then left them submerged for several hours. All ok. Thanks!

I also marked them so in the field when I open them I will make 1 last double check when I open them.

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