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Caribou Restoration Wisc. Mich. Minn?
Caribou
Contributors to this thread:
Saphead 21-Mar-24
JSW 21-Mar-24
DanaC 21-Mar-24
Saphead 21-Mar-24
APauls 21-Mar-24
Kurt 21-Mar-24
Saphead 21-Mar-24
BoggsBowhunts 21-Mar-24
kentuckbowhnter 21-Mar-24
bghunter 21-Mar-24
bghunter 21-Mar-24
walking buffalo 21-Mar-24
Beendare 21-Mar-24
blue spot 21-Mar-24
Saphead 21-Mar-24
TonyBear 21-Mar-24
WI Shedhead 21-Mar-24
WI Shedhead 21-Mar-24
bowyer45 21-Mar-24
Mule Power 21-Mar-24
MQQSE 22-Mar-24
Saphead 23-Mar-24
ki-ke 23-Mar-24
Shrewski 23-Mar-24
Gun 24-Mar-24
blue spot 25-Mar-24
>>>--arrow1--> 28-May-24
APauls 28-May-24
From: Saphead
21-Mar-24
Does anyone know if this has ever been tried or talked about seriously? I read Maine did it in the 80's and failed. Maybe because the held them at a facility too long and they got the brain worm, also predators were too succesful.

From: JSW
21-Mar-24
Without a massive wolf control effort ahead of time, it would be a complete waste of time and money.

From: DanaC
21-Mar-24
Maine has a huge problem with ticks infecting their moose population. Also, moose get brain worms from white tail deer. Not sure how these problems would affect Caribou.

From: Saphead
21-Mar-24
As of a few years ago there was a small herd still coming into northern Idaho. Mt Lions were hard on them. No calves making it past the first year. How did they make it 500 years ago but can't now? Not sure if this herd is still there. Sure would like to see them in the lower 48 again

From: APauls
21-Mar-24
Caribou are like lemmings. Their defence is basically numbers. Wolves and cats would simply wipe them out unless you start with numbers. Such little intelligence, they've got no chance. Their calving rate is low, they're simply not built to withstand predator pressure.

From: Kurt
21-Mar-24
Don't think the Idaho/BC border herd exists anymore. There were one or two left 4 years ago and they got moved up near another herd further north as I remember.

Central BC herds are struggling too despite wolf control, "maternity pens" where they helicopter net gun capture pregnant cows. They move them to a wolf and grizzly proof enclosure to stop predation during calving before letting them loose.

This article has quite a bit of info: https://www.fws.gov/story/2023-09/southern-mountain-caribou-make-comeback

From: Saphead
21-Mar-24
Thanks Kurt Still wonder how they have made it this far considering the weakness to predators.

21-Mar-24
If the herd in the lower 48 historically survived however long ago, was it because there was fewer predators back then compared to now? I’d assume predator numbers of wolves and lions were much higher back then. Since they’re highly migratory, I’m assuming that construction amongst travel corridors likely had something to do with it?

I’ve personally never seen imagery of caribou in urbanesque areas like you do other wild game. Seems like the biggest shift today more so than the predator discussion would be construction amongst travel corridors?

I’m a hillbilly from Missouri and have no proof or reasoning other than “I just think so” but that’s what I would assume. I’d much rather them introduce caribou than wolves…. I haven’t seen any images of domestic dogs getting eaten by caribou!

21-Mar-24
I wonder if you stocked an endangered species, caribou, and another species was wiping them out if it would give the hunting community leverage in court against wolves?

From: bghunter
21-Mar-24
WI can barely grow the elk herd because of the wolves. I don't think caribou would stand a chance.

From: bghunter
21-Mar-24
WI can barely grow the elk herd because of the wolves. I don't think caribou would stand a chance.

21-Mar-24
Predator Pit population dynamics, exacerbated by lots and lots of roads (high speed travel corridors for wolves).

Southern Caribou survival in modern times require the elimination of predators or roads.

I once saw about 20 caribou at once in BC near the Idaho border. That won't happen again in my lifetime. I used to see hundreds of Sage grouse when hunting Pronghorns in Southern Alberta. Now there are less than 50 in the Province. They are expected to be extirpated in a few years.

What we thought were relatively benign human activities can quickly eliminate wildlife.

From: Beendare
21-Mar-24
Apauls nailed it.

So we humans continue to try to stop evolution, pretty silly when you think about it.

Some species are just not going to make it ...and thats the way nature intended it.

From: blue spot
21-Mar-24
I believe the caribou stocked in Maine were behind the eight ball due to lack of sufficient habitat and natural predators. But the locale rednecks got most of them before the natural predators had a chance. I believe it was pretty stiff competition for the bragging rights to see who ate one first. I don't have first hand knowledge of it but have herd it from enough people in the timber harvesting and forestry industry that I believe it is not just a story. Much like I am fully confident there were many locals eating moose that didn't draw a tag. Erik

From: Saphead
21-Mar-24
Hadn't thought of the wolves doing more damage because of using the roads. Makes sense. I don't think roads stop caribou at least not a 2 lane. ( Haul road) Pretty sad deal overall.

From: TonyBear
21-Mar-24
Way too many ticks and wolves in MN. The woodland caribou was only a transient visitor to extreme NE part of the state anyway. Don't bother.

From: WI Shedhead
21-Mar-24
As said above- The whitetails can’t make it in northern wisconsin with all the wolves how’s a caribou gonna

From: WI Shedhead
21-Mar-24
In Wisconin Look at how long it took the transplanted elk to take where thier were enough to have a limited hunting season. In the same time frame it took wisconsin to get a herd to 200 animals Kentucky grew thier herd to 1400. Says a lot for what apex predators can do

From: bowyer45
21-Mar-24
Caribou were reintroduced in Wisconsin in the early 1900's, they didn't take well. However the last Caribou was killed in Wisconsin around 1939. elk also were unsuccessfully stocked then.

From: Mule Power
21-Mar-24
You mean feed the wolves? Good luck.

From: MQQSE
22-Mar-24

MQQSE's Link

From: Saphead
23-Mar-24
Makes you wonder how they survived in the past, Something is off

From: ki-ke
23-Mar-24
Unfortunately, this is likely accurate.....

"Apauls nailed it. So we humans continue to try to stop evolution, pretty silly when you think about it.

Some species are just not going to make it ...and thats the way nature intended it."

There is an extensive list of long gone spectacular big game species that we never had the chance to accumulate points for the chance at a tag. They all thrived and went away without the interference of modern man.

Imagine drawing a Montana Mastodon cow tag after accumulating 20 points? The sweet love that would be made on that hide in front of my fireplace......right under the sabertoothed tiger full body mount.....

From: Shrewski
23-Mar-24
Any effort to reestablish caribou in MN, WI, MI is just going to be very expensive wolf food. Bad idea.

From: Gun
24-Mar-24
I remember when I lived in Wisconsin, many years ago (70s?) there was talk about introducing Moose in the northern part. It was decided that some kind of worm would infect the deer population. Since living in Alberta for the last 35+ years I have never heard of any such issues and hunt in habitat where I see both Moose and Whitetails constantly.

From: blue spot
25-Mar-24
Gun, You are referring to Brain Worm. Deer can carry it with no ill effects. In moose the brain acts as it name implies. The worm will make its way to the brain and consume it i believe. The moose understandably gradually goes crazy running in large slow circles until it finally falls over and then it continues to "run" until it finally dies and is out of it's misery. Pretty miserable to find where an animal has dug all the ground up from its legs and head continuing to go for what must have been a couple days. When deer are below a certain density, I forget the number, moose can reasonably coexist with deer. Above that number most all moose will die from the brain worm within 3-4 years of age. One of my professors in college claimed all the students got brain worm. Generally from sitting on T-Hall lawn in the spring. Highly transmissible. And once infected you would just run around and act stupid for the rest of the semester. Erik

28-May-24
Wis. has to restore the northern whitetail population first......

From: APauls
28-May-24
Plus - where are you going to get your "seed" caribou when they are universally struggling? There isn't a population to draw from that isn't a mirage of what it once was.

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