Sitka Mountain Gear
Michigan confirms 11 case of CWD
Michigan
Contributors to this thread:
flounder 15-Nov-17
flounder 15-Nov-17
JL 17-Nov-17
Annony Mouse 17-Nov-17
JL 17-Nov-17
Annony Mouse 18-Nov-17
JL 18-Nov-17
Missouribreaks 26-Nov-17
Annony Mouse 26-Nov-17
BIG BEAR 27-Nov-17
Annony Mouse 28-Nov-17
From: flounder
15-Nov-17

flounder's Link
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2017 Michigan confirms 11 case of CWD TSE Prion http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/11/michigan-confirms-11-case-of-cwd-tse.html

From: flounder
15-Nov-17

flounder's Link
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2017

Assessment of CWD prion shedding in deer saliva with occupancy modeling

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2017/11/assessment-of-cwd-prion-shedding-in.html

From: JL
17-Nov-17
If you don't get the DNR emails, there are 3 more in the que awaiting confirmation. If they are confirmed, that would be 14.

From: Annony Mouse
17-Nov-17
Federal lab confirms Montcalm County deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease

This is second hunter-harvested CWD-positive deer in Montcalm County; three additional suspect positives awaiting confirmation

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced today that the 1.5-year-old buck, harvested last month in Sidney Township (Montcalm County), was confirmed positive for chronic wasting disease by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. This is the 11th case of CWD to be confirmed in a free-ranging deer in Michigan.

Since the harvest of that deer, three additional suspect positive deer – all from Montcalm County, in Pine, Reynolds and Sidney townships – are awaiting confirmation.

“Thank you to these hunters for checking their deer, which is required for these areas. Hunter assistance is critical in the ongoing fight against the spread of CWD,” said Chad Stewart, DNR deer specialist. “The response from hunters so far shows a strong willingness to help, and it’s clear that more hunters are committed to getting their deer tested.”

There are three Core CWD Areas that have mandatory check. To determine if a hunting location is within a mandatory check area, or to find the nearest DNR deer check station, visit michigan.gov/cwd.

“In a short amount of time, without many deer tested from these areas, we are finding more CWD-positive deer,” Stewart said. “This is concerning. We cannot emphasize enough how important it is for hunters from the surrounding areas that are outside of mandatory check locations to have their deer tested, too.”

To date, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in humans. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend that infected animals not be consumed as food by either humans or domestic animals.

CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. It is caused by the transmission of infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and other body fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by direct exposure to these fluids, from environments contaminated with these fluids or the carcass of a diseased animal.

From: JL
17-Nov-17

JL's Link
A prime example of how it could/does spread.

From: Annony Mouse
18-Nov-17
Urine based scent lures are a big danger in the spread of CWD. Those products come from farmed cervids which have an established linkage to the disease.

From: JL
18-Nov-17
Farm deer are supposed to be regulated by APHIS....probably much better than wild deer. I would go with baiting and bait plots and APR's.

26-Nov-17

Missouribreaks's Link
Let em grow, let them spread CWD?...... APR's?

From: Annony Mouse
26-Nov-17
There is no test to determine if a farmed cervid has CWD unless it is put down and its brain tested. The tests done on live animals only determine that the animal does not have detectable CWD prions; i.e. level of prions are below the detectable level of the test used.

Collecting piss from farmed animals (the link between CWD and farmed cervids is well established) and pouring it on our hunting grounds increases the odds of spreading CWD into new areas. Wonder why there is little comment on this vector of spreading CWD. Could it be money?

From: BIG BEAR
27-Nov-17
They made does off limits to archers in the U.P.,,,,,, But as soon as they detect one deer with CWD in the U.P.,,, They will reverse that and make it an all out war on deer to reduce the numbers.... I'm sure it's going to happen because they are setting up testing check stations in the U.P. If they test I'm sure they'll find a few infected deer..

From: Annony Mouse
28-Nov-17

Annony Mouse's Link
One can cross out that dated statement WRT CWD and human health so often stated in articles about CWD. Research has shown that the abnormal prions can be transferred to non-human primates via eating venison from infected deers.

Eighteen macaques have been exposed to CWD in various ways to study the transmission potential of the disease (eating contaminated venison, injection of material into the brains and rubbing infected material on skin (equivalent of dressing and butchering a deer)).

Three of five macaques that were fed infected white-tailed deer meat over a three-year period tested positive for CWD.

The meat fed to the macaques represented the human equivalent of eating a 7-ounce steak per month.

None of the macaques rubbed with positive prion material developed CWD.

The diagnostic lab at MSU is screening over a thousand deer a day (from MI and other states) using an ELISA assay. Positives are sent to Ames for verification.

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