Sitka Mountain Gear
What's this weed?
Massachusetts
Contributors to this thread:
Will 03-Jun-18
TT-Pi 03-Jun-18
Wachusett 03-Jun-18
Will 03-Jun-18
huntskifishcook 03-Jun-18
bigsevig 03-Jun-18
Tekoa 04-Jun-18
Will 04-Jun-18
Tekoa 04-Jun-18
mboudreau 05-Jun-18
Will 05-Jun-18
Belchertown Bowman 05-Jun-18
Jebediah 05-Jun-18
Jebediah 05-Jun-18
TT-Pi 05-Jun-18
Wachusett 05-Jun-18
Dthfrmabove 06-Jun-18
bigsevig 06-Jun-18
From: Will
03-Jun-18

Will's embedded Photo
Will's embedded Photo
Hi guys.

What's this weed?

The past few years this stuff has tried to choke our garden with prolific growth. Gets big too, like 2 feet or so... prolific in numbers. Pulls out easy which is good, because there is a frigging lot...

From: TT-Pi
03-Jun-18
It looks like Chenopodium Family /Common Lambsquarters/ Goosefoot.

From: Wachusett
03-Jun-18
Kind of looks like jewel weed, if it produces an orange flower that's probably what it is. Pulls out super easy, grows everywhere. It can be used as a natural poison ivy remedy if you break the stem and rub it on your skin.

From: Will
03-Jun-18
Not jewel weed for sure... I'll have to check that stuff Pi.

03-Jun-18
I 2nd Pi, it does look like lambsquarter. If so, it's totally edible and pretty good in salads.

From: bigsevig
03-Jun-18
stinging nettle looks similar,but youd know by now!

From: Tekoa
04-Jun-18
Will That is lambsquarters also called goosefoot or wild spinach. I think it is one of the best wild forage greens. I only volounteer to weed the garden when it starts showing up. It is delicious. Just Google lambsquarters Tekoa

From: Will
04-Jun-18
Thanks guys! That sounds fortuitous... freash arugula, lettuce, radish and apparently, goosefoot salad on the way :)

From: Tekoa
04-Jun-18
I do steam it. Like every food in moderation. It does have oxalates but so does domestic spinach.

From: mboudreau
05-Jun-18

mboudreau's embedded Photo
mboudreau's embedded Photo
While we are talking about weed, any idea what this is? Grows a foot a day and strangles every tree it finds...drives me nuts

From: Will
05-Jun-18
Others are way better at botany that Ill ever be Mboudreau... But, that sure sounds a lot like the bittersweet in my "pit", and looks similar. The positive, the birds enjoy it, as do the little critters (the orange berries, not the leaves, regrettably) and if you find it in the woods, make a note of it, deer love the berries after the first or second snow or a few good hard frosts.

I was going at it with the saw blade on my trimmer each fall, but it would grow, what felt like 10 feet a year. So by the time I got there it would already be way up into my spruce trees and some arbor vitae we have. "the pit" at my house is the cul de sac's drainage easement. We put ever greens around a lot of it to reduce the "eye sore" factor and have laced it with wild flowers... so it's not to bad looking... But, if I dont cut that bittersweet down, even one year... it's NASTY to try and clear.

I did discover though, if you do it when the stuff is small - like in your pic - a standard nylon string on your trimmer v a saw blade can work. I figured that out this weekend when I was cutting back grasses and baby sumac in the pit and along the southern edge, which doubles as the kids luge track in the winter. Like the baby sumac, the baby bittersweet can be cut smoothly with the standard nylon thread on the trimmer. Give it two months and that is not the case.

Not fan's of roundup, so we just deal with hacking it down every year... but I suspose that would be an option if you are ok with killing everything and starting over. Otherwise the dang stuff is practically unkillable!

05-Jun-18
Try this you guys,.. get the round up, but rather than spray it all over,.. get a paint brush and paint the leaves with it.

do this once and done,.. whack it back and you need to whack it back every year!

From: Jebediah
05-Jun-18
I have no philosophical objection to roundup, but I agree, I hate the collateral damage. Painting on the concentrate is one way I know of for killing big vines—cut it and paint a little concentrate on the stump, or whatever it’s called. Otherwise if you just cut it, half the time the stump acts like a hydra (Medusa?), you get 20 new vines coming out of the stump. This painting this is indeed pretty surgical, but it’s not really an option in many instances. Vines are really extremely evil.

From: Jebediah
05-Jun-18
Here’s something interesting, and totally appropriate here on Roundupsite: I’m pretty sure moss is naturally roundup-resistant.

From: TT-Pi
05-Jun-18
American Bittersweet has orange seed capsules that will produce berries. The flowers and then the berries are at the ends of the vine.

Oriental bittersweet has yellow seed capsules and they are dispersed all along the vine.

To kill either one, cut the vine and spray the cut surface of the vine stump with herbicide.

From: Wachusett
05-Jun-18
Yea looks like bittersweet to me too. If you pull it up and it has orange roots, that's what it is. Spreads like hell but isn't bad to look at if in the right place.

From: Dthfrmabove
06-Jun-18
Mark that stuff is a deer magnet. Got a ton of that around my backyard and the deer eat the heck out of it. Check to see if there are sections of that plant that don’t have leaves ??

From: bigsevig
06-Jun-18
celestrus bittersweet as others have said,super invasive and strangles trees.birds disperse seeds and it is everywhere. as ttpi said get rid of it.

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