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Cutthroats Broadheads on Elk
Colorado
Contributors to this thread:
goelk 12-Aug-21
tradi-doerr 12-Aug-21
Buglmin 12-Aug-21
Dale06 12-Aug-21
seneca_inc 13-Aug-21
zimmy 13-Aug-21
Goelk 14-Aug-21
Colobow 15-Aug-21
Colobow 15-Aug-21
oldgoat 15-Aug-21
tradi-doerr 16-Aug-21
deadhead4 16-Aug-21
goelk 16-Aug-21
kluzakd 16-Aug-21
butcherboy 17-Aug-21
Hondolane 23-Aug-21
Treeline 24-Aug-21
Treeline 25-Aug-21
Surfbow 25-Aug-21
goelk 26-Sep-21
tradi-doerr 26-Sep-21
goelk 26-Sep-21
Buglmin 27-Sep-21
CONative 28-Sep-21
bugslinger 25-Oct-21
goelk 25-Oct-21
jacobsbrayan 26-Dec-22
Hondolane 18-Jan-23
From: goelk
12-Aug-21
Would like to know how the Single Bevel Cutthroats Broadheads on Elk been for you. Thanks

From: tradi-doerr
12-Aug-21
Love em! Pro: great penetration and lots of tissue damage & have recovered everything shot with them. Con: sometimes doesn't leave much of a blood trail-typical of a two blade head. Hoping to see how they do on a Colorado bull moose this season!

From: Buglmin
12-Aug-21
Had a guy with a dozen cut throats in the shop today, struggling with broadhead flight. Once we started weighing them, I wasn't very impressed with cut throats. The lightest was 142 grains, the heaviest 161 grains. All were supposed to be 150 grain heads. Only six were within 148 grains and 153 grains. I'm stick to my Daysix Evo's.

From: Dale06
12-Aug-21
That seems like a lot of variance in weight.

From: seneca_inc
13-Aug-21
I used them one season. I had pass thrus on two elk, but not much of a blood trail. This was the two blade, single bevel 125g, with 55# recurve. I went back to heads that have a bleeder blade (Magnus Hornet).

From: zimmy
13-Aug-21
Just a word of caution, before you order be sure of the rotation of you arrow when it comes of the bow string, thats why they make right and left single bevels.

From: Goelk
14-Aug-21
Thanks guys for your in put

From: Colobow
15-Aug-21
Maybe check/match up the weights,

From: Colobow
15-Aug-21
There are notable variations in the weights of popular "match grade" bullets. Same difference.

From: oldgoat
15-Aug-21
I've weighed a good number of cutthroats and never had that kind of weight variance, were they bought new, used, did the guy not know how to sharpen them and grind off a lot of weight, I know tons of guys using them for however many years now and not having that problem!

From: tradi-doerr
16-Aug-21
I just weighed 9 of mine and they were all with in 2gr+/- of 150gr, 148gr - 152gr. And I get great arrow flight out of them, just have to line the blades up a specific way.

From: deadhead4
16-Aug-21
All Cutthroat heads are weighed before they are put in a package. I know this because I've watched them do it.

From: goelk
16-Aug-21
Mmmm interesting

From: kluzakd
16-Aug-21
I like how they sharpen easily, however,, may look for different heads next year especially for how much they want for 3 heads now. They are not 200 grains on my scale. I have 2 different packages that are 200 gr RH bevel. Below are the weights. RMSG sharpened them for me.

Pkge 1 bought last yr - 178.4, 178.3, other head is missing Pkge 2 bought this year 187.2, 187.4 and 186.9

From: butcherboy
17-Aug-21
I liked them when I shot them. I don’t believe that the cause of less blood on the ground is because it’s a two blade head. I’ve had many 4 and 3 blade heads leave very little blood. I think it all depends on how sharp the broadhead is and what’s cut when it passes through. I know some will say the extra blades have a greater chance of cutting more which is true to a point. I had old 2 blade Bear broadheads leave blood trails a blind man could follow.

Main thing is to shoot what you have confidence in and make sure it is sharp. The last elk I killed with a cutthroat wreaked havoc on the lungs. Elk dropped in less than 20 yards.

From: Hondolane
23-Aug-21
Their amazing with trad and my compound… the 3 blade is wicked

From: Treeline
24-Aug-21
I have certainly not seen that kind of weight variation with those. Have the single bevel 150, 200, and 250 grain screw in heads and 160 grain glue on. Will weigh mine and provide the variances.

Have shot a total of three through elk. Two 150’s and one 200. Both 150’s were complete pass throughs. The 200 broke the offside shoulder and stopped. Furthest recovery was less than 100 yards. One good blood trail and two marginal. Good, solid heads that can definitely help if you hit a shoulder and will penetrate well. Would use them for really big critters like buffalo for sure.

Have also shot a bear, a couple of deer and an antelope with the 200s and 250s. Full pass through on the bear, antelope and one deer. Sticking out the offside shoulder on one deer. Better blood trails on the deer than elk or bear.

Have better blood on the ground with 3-blades and am using 200 grain 1 1/4” VPAs, Cutthroats, and Snuffers this year. Have had really good success with Snuffers and other 3-blades over the years off my longbows including quite a few complete pass throughs on elk.

From: Treeline
25-Aug-21
OK. Weighed a few Cutthroat 2-blade heads:

150’s - 151, 151, 150 (1 grain difference)

200’s - 202, 202, 201, 202, 201 (1 grain difference)

250’s - 256, 255, 253, 255, 254, 255 (3 grains difference)

160 glue on with a 100 grain adapter - 269, 269, 269 (0 grains difference)

Good enough for the critters I shoot ‘em at!

From: Surfbow
25-Aug-21
I wonder if the guys complaining about weights ever bother to calibrate their scale...

From: goelk
26-Sep-21
well after two weeks in the woods i was unable to let a arrow fly to see what would Cutthroats would do. Next year!

From: tradi-doerr
26-Sep-21
I used them on my bull moose, again I am very impressed with the penetration and the tissue damage they do. I rarely take pics of the internal damage but the shots through the lungs and heart were twisted massive holes.

From: goelk
26-Sep-21
wow thanks tradi-doerr

From: Buglmin
27-Sep-21
I work in a bow shop, and the grain scale is extremely accurate. The only other heads I've seen off weight was the abowyers.

From: CONative
28-Sep-21

CONative's embedded Photo
CONative's embedded Photo
Well after reading this thread I weighed all 6 of my 125g single bevel heads. They were all within 3 grains of one another. Last Wednesday I was able to get an arrow in this bull at 40 yards. Great penetration and completely amazed at the twist slicing through the lungs. Didn't have a blood trail to follow as he went less than 10 yards. I am 5'1" with a 24.5" draw length so as you can imagine I don't get a ton of speed on my set up. Very impressed with how these broadheads performed on an elk!

From: bugslinger
25-Oct-21
I sent one through a bull a couple years ago, hit him wayyyyy back 250 grain head 51# longbow. The bull went approx. 50 yards and was dead within 10-11 seconds. Bloodtrail was not neon flashing lights, but plenty enough to easily follow. I found the arrow the following day stuck in a downed log and could still shave arm hair with it. Admitting my own ignorance, I did not sharpen the heads out of the package and relied on the edge created by grinding the bevel. Its one data point so take it for what's worth, but I have no issues hunting with them again.

From: goelk
25-Oct-21
thanks for sharing appreciated

From: jacobsbrayan
26-Dec-22
In the bow shop where I work, we use a very precise grain scale. The abowyers' was the only other out-of-balance head I'd ever seen. the backrooms

From: Hondolane
18-Jan-23
Their amazing.. killed lots of game with them.. I guess I’m not a good enough shot to tell they weighed different.. their great heads bottom line..

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